The 2020 NFL Draft rolls on today with the final four rounds. Round four will get underway at noon eastern today. And from the first pick of the day until the last, PFN Chief Draft Analyst Tony Pauline and PFN Senior Draft Analyst Andrew DiCecco will have you covered with instant pick-by-pick analysis. Of course, Pauline will also share the latest draft buzz all day long. So check back here early and often.

Featured Content: Day 3 of the 2020 NFL Draft

2020 NFL Draft Live Blog with Pauline & DiCecco: Day 3
PFN Mock Draft Simulator
Tony Pauline’s Best Remaining Players
Brad Kelly's Best Remaining Prospects on Day 3
Tony Pauline's Rankings and Scouting Reports
Kent Platte’s Relative Athletic Scores (RAS)
PFN Consensus Top 300 Big Board
2020 NFL Draft Resource and Content Guide
2020 NFL Draft Live Blog with Pauline & DiCecco: Day 2
2020 NFL Draft Live Blog with Pauline & DiCecco: Day 1

2020 NFL Draft – Round 7

255. New York Giants: Tae Crowder, ILB, Georgia

Pauline’s Ranking: #436 (ILB29) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Georgia’s Tae Crowder is a tough, run defending inside/middle linebacker who I thought played better in 2018 than last season.  He’s a hard-working defender with limited physical skills.

DiCecco: The Giants finish off the three-day marathon by taking Georgia’s Tae Crowder. Like his range and urgency flowing to the football. Mr. Irrelevant has a better-than-average shot of making their football team.

254. Denver Broncos: Derreck Tuszka, Edge, North Dakota State

Pauline’s Ranking: #309 (DE21) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Denver gets their type of player in Derrek Tuszka- tough, intense, and productive. He was incredibly productive for NDSU and will be a good situational pass rusher on Sunday.

DiCecco: Derrek Tuszka is a player I pegged for the Philadelphia Eagles, but he plays with a lot of energy, toughness, and relentless motor. Appreciate his get-off. Will need to add size to his frame.

253. Minnesota Vikings: Kyle Hinton, G, Washburn

Pauline’s Ranking: #242 (G15) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #258 | RAS: 9.65

Pauline: In the weeks leading up to the draft I mentioned Kyle Hinton as one of the fastest small school risers.  He was a left tackle at Washburn but projects to guard in the NFL and should do well in the Vikings zone blocking scheme.

DiCecco:

252. Denver Broncos: Tyrie Cleveland, WR, Florida

Pauline’s Ranking: #215 (WR31) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #201 | RAS: 9.65

Pauline: The Broncos draft another physically talented receiver with great upside.  Tyrie Cleveland possesses the size and speed to play on Sunday and has flashed skill.  He’s a solid developmental prospect.

DiCecco: Earlier, I wrote that I was surprised Freddie Swain went before Cleveland. Cleveland is one of the more overlooked vertical threats in this class, and while he only mustered 79 receptions for the Gators over his four-year career, he has a more enticing athletic profile than his Gator counterparts.

251. Seattle Seahawks: Stephen Sullivan, TE, LSU

Pauline’s Ranking: #138 (TE7) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #170 | RAS: 7.45

Pauline: Stephen Sullivan, back-up to Thaddeus Moss, is drafted before his teammate.  Sullivan offers incredible size, speed, and athleticism, but rarely produced in college.  Three days of great practice at the Senior Bowl followed by a terrific combine workout cemented his status as a draftable player.

DiCecco: Stephen Sullivan has an intriguing physical skill set to work with, and enjoyed a productive pre-draft cycle. Goes before Thad Moss.

250. Los Angeles Rams: Tremayne Anchrum, G, Clemson

Pauline’s Ranking: #191 (G10) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #224 | RAS: 4.6

Pauline: Tremayne Anchrum was Clemson’s tackle who did a solid job against Chase Young in the semi-final game. He’s a small area blocker with limited upside but a tough, resilient blocker.

DiCecco: I had Tremayne Anchrum graded as a PFA, but his senior tape was good, as demonstrated his ability to hold his own with some of college football’s elite. Project player, but Rams offensive line coach Aaron Kromer will have fun developing his skill set.

249. Minnesota Vikings: Brian Cole II, S, Mississippi State

Pauline’s Ranking: #239 (S20) | Scouting Report 
PFN Consensus: #230 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Brian Cole is a nice sized safety who plays the position like a linebacker.  He’s best as a strong safety, defending the run and playing downhill.

DiCecco: Brian Cole II is an interesting player. He spent his first two seasons as a member of East Mississippi Community College (where he was teammates with Tyre Phillips), and came into his own last season for the Bulldogs. Hard-nosed player that plays his best football around the line of scrimmage.

248. Los Angeles Rams: Sam Sloman, PK, Miami (OH)

Pauline’s Ranking: #N/A | Scouting Report – N/A
PFN Consensus: #N/A| RAS: N/A

Pauline: N/A

DiCecco: N/A

247. New York Giants: Chris Williamson, CB, Minnesota

Pauline’s Ranking: #266 (RB14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #233| RAS: N/A

Pauline: Chris Williamson is someone I really liked but could not give a draftable grade off the 2019 film. As a junior in 2018, Williamson looked like a lockdown corner before transitioning and struggling at nickel last year.  He comes with terrific size, speed and has shown ability in the past.

DiCecco: Chris Williamson was one of my favorite late-round defensive backs. Florida recruit who transferred to Minnesota for his final two seasons of eligibility. Good size for a cornerback (6-1, 205), and while he shined as nickel defender for the Golden Gophers, he has the versatility to play on the outside and potentially safety. Physical, smart player with good versatility.

246. Miami Dolphins: Malcolm Perry, RB, Navy

Pauline’s Ranking: #214 (RB14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #252 | RAS: 1.91

Pauline: Navy quarterback Malcolm Perry gets selected in the final picks of the draft.  The Dolphins list him at wide receiver, a position he handled well during Shrine Game practices.  Perry is smart, incredibly quick and versatile.  I expect the Dolphins to give him a try in the slot, line him up in the backfield as a running back and let him return punts.

DiCecco: The Dolphins make an interesting selection in the waning stages of the seventh round, selecting former Navy quarterback Malcolm Perry. Perry played wide receiver and running back during Shrine week and looked fairly comfortable doing so. He showcased his elusiveness, vision, and burst in the open field. His route running looked further along than some of his counterparts, so I wouldn’t be shocked if he found a spot as a depth/gadget player.

245. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Raymond Calais, RB, Louisiana

Pauline’s Ranking: #262 (RB20) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #242 | RAS: 7.59

Pauline: Raymond Calais was well-liked in some parts of the scouting community and a wise choice by the Bucs in round seven. He’s a small scatback with terrific quickness, speed, and the ability to turn the perimeter.

DiCecco: I covered Raymond Calais extensively this season while covering the Sun Belt, smallish running back that is extremely shifty after the catch, I think TB may deploy him at wide receiver.

244. Minnesota Vikings: Nate Stanley, QB, Iowa

Pauline’s Ranking: #252 (QB14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #225 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: There were some teams who stamped Stanley as early as the fourth round but I struggled to put a seventh-round grade on him. He possesses classic pocket passer size, terrific football intelligence, and a next-level arm. The problem is Stanley’s passes are all over the place to the point he misses wide open receivers which leads to a major loss of opportunity for his offense.

DiCecco: I wasn’t particularly high on Nate Stanley, as I felt his game lacked overall polish. He must improve his accuracy, footwork, and learn to work through his progressions with more consistency.

243. Tennessee Titans: Chris Jackson, CB, Marshall

Pauline’s Ranking: #644 (CB64) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 8.54

Pauline: Chris Jackson was someone I graded as draftable prior to the start of the 2019 season but moved to FA status after a disappointing senior campaign.  He possesses solid size and ball skills, though speed is a concern.

DiCecco:

242. Green Bay Packers: Jonathan Garvin, Edge, Miami (Fl)

Pauline’s Ranking: #259 (DE17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #248 | RAS: 8.98

Pauline: Jonathan Garvin surprised many entering the draft but the tape proves he has next-level ability.  He’s an athletic pass rusher/defensive end with size as well as growth potential.  I expect to see Garvin on a practice squad this fall.

DiCecco: Jonathan Garvin has raw ability but is far from a finished product. His athletic traits will likely prompt the Packers to find a way to keep him in the building in the fall, though more than likely in a practice squad capacity.

241. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Chapelle Russell, OLB, Purdue

Pauline’s Ranking: #295 (OLB27) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #270 | RAS: 6.8

Pauline: Chapelle Russell is a linebacker I really liked but moved off of a draftable last week, foolish me.  He’s another athletic run and chase linebacker from Temple who is terrific up the field or in lateral pursuit.

DiCecco: Temple University has been well-represented on Day 3, with Shaun Bradley, Harrison Hand, and now Chapelle Russell coming off the board. Athletic, rangy linebacker that holds his own in coverage. Tampa adds more speed on defense.

240. New Orleans Saints: Tommy Stevens, QB, Mississippi State

Pauline’s Ranking: #455 (QB26)  |
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Saints take a flyer on Tommy Stevens in the final round.  He’s a fireball passer with a big-time arm and next-level size.  His accuracy and pass placement border on atrocious and many scouts believe Stevens will ultimately be moved to tight end.

DiCecco: I did not have a draftable grade on Tommy Stevens, but the Mississippi State quarterback has a live arm and intriguing tools to work with. He didn’t have a sharp week at the Shrine Bowl, and will likely be little more than camp fodder, but Stevens could find his way onto a practice squad.

239. Buffalo Bills: Dane Jackson, CB, Pittsburgh

Pauline’s Ranking: #161 (CB19)  | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #154 | RAS: 4.44

Pauline: The Bills get a real good bump and run corner in Dane Jackson. The Panther senior has nice size and plays tough, instinctive football. What he lacks in speed and Jackson must play in a system that protects him from the deep ball.

DiCecco:

238. New York Giants: T.J. Brunson, LB, South Carolina

Pauline’s Ranking: #182 (ILB08)  | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #206 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Giants get a terrific linebacker in T.J. Brunson, who I graded as a sixth-round pick. He comes with marginal size and speed but plays big, fierce football and is much more athletic than given credit for.

DiCecco: T.J. Brunson is a steal at this point of the draft. He won’t win teams over with measurables or testing numbers, but he has the football IQ and mentality that should keep him in the league for a long time.

237. Kansas City Chiefs: Thakarius Keyes, CB, Tulane

Pauline’s Ranking: #220 (CB25)  | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #213 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Thakarius Keyes possesses next level size as well as speed and has flashed big-time ability on occasion. He comes with an upside and can play special teams but Keyes needs to improve the consistency of his game.

DiCecco: Thakarius Keyes has an intriguing blend of length and speed, has flashed on occasion for the Green Wave. Not sure he offers starter-upside, but I think he can win a depth role this summer and find in his way onto field in a limited capacity as a rookie.

236. Green Bay Packers: Vernon Scott, DB, Texas Christian

Pauline’s Ranking: #N/A  | 
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline:

DiCecco:

235. Detroit Lions: Jashon Cornell, DT, Ohio State

Pauline’s Ranking: #441 (DT37) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Jashon Cornell is a defensive tackle with defensive end size and speed. He has limitation but would be effective as a three-technique tackle.

DiCecco: The Lions add undersized defensive tackle Jashon Cornell. Played in nearly 50 games over his Buckeyes career, but logged just 15 starts.

234. Los Angeles Rams: Clay Johnston, ILB, Baylor

Pauline’s Ranking: #356 (ILB21) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Clay Johnston was given draftable grades prior to the season but a knee injury halted his campaign. He comes with average size and speed but Johnston is an instinctive two down defender who stands out against the run.

DiCecco: The Rams add an interesting player in Baylor LB Clay Johnston. I had him graded as a PFA, as he suffered a season-ending knee injury in October and could only bench at the NFL Combine, but Johnston generally has good play-strength and instincts. Swarms to the football.

233. Philidelphia Eagles: Casey Toohill, OLB, Stanford

Pauline’s Ranking: #154 (OLB15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #191 | RAS: 9.7

Pauline: The Eagles get another steal in edge rusher/OLB Casey Toohill. The Stanford senior is intelligent, forceful, and very athletic. I think he’s a better fit as a 3-4 OLB than the Eagles 4-3 alignment.

DiCecco: Philadelphia lands Casey Toohill, who really impressed me as an active, violent pass rusher during Shrine week. Love his motor. He will need to add some size to his frame but Eagles fans will love his tenacity.

232. Pittsburgh Steelers: Carlos Davis, DT, Nebraska

Pauline’s Ranking: #201 (DT19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #226 | RAS: 8.64

Pauline: As a sophomore, Carlos Davis looked like a star in the making but lost his mojo after moving around the defensive line and never got it back.  A natural three-technique tackle, Davis has a chance for the Steelers at defensive end.

DiCecco: Carlos Davis is the lesser-heralded of the Davis brothers, and while he isn’t quite as disruptive as a Khalil, Carlos offers more versatility along the defensive line. Battled an injury during Shrine week, but I like his upside as a 3T.

231. Dallas Cowboys: Ben DiNucci, QB, JMU

Pauline’s Ranking: #341 (QB20) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: # N/A| RAS: N/A

Pauline: For the past two years I’ve gushed over JMU quarterback Ben DiNucci. He’s a great leader on offense and a passer who makes plays in the pocket or on the move.  I fully expect DiNucci to compete for a job on the active roster this fall.

DiCecco:

230. New England Patriots: Dustin Woodward, C, Memphis

Pauline’s Ranking: #N/A  |
PFN Consensus: # N/A| RAS: N/A

Pauline: Dustin Woodard was not graded by scouts entering the season but played well as a senior and was building upward momentum the past month.  Though short, he has a stout build and plays smart, tough football.

DiCecco: New England continues to stockpile relatively obscure lineman, this time it’s Memphis interior lineman Dustin Woodward. Started 54 games for the Tigers.

229. Washington Redskins: James Smith-Williams, DE, North Carolina State

Pauline’s Ranking: #153 (DE12) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #198 | RAS: 9.02

Pauline: From the stand-point of athleticism and physical gifts, James Smith-Williams grades as a day two pick.  Yet he never consistently produced on the football field and struggled with injury as a senior.  He comes with tremendous upside as a pass rusher out of a three-point stance or standing over tackle.

DiCecco: Washington takes a player with multiple season-ending injuries, which are the primary culprit responsible for Smith-Williams’ draft tumble, but the 6’4″ 265-pound edge rusher plays with imposing strength to anchor and set the edge against the run, and is patient when working his moves as a rusher. Not sure he makes the roster outright, but think he finds his way onto an active roster in 2020.

228. Atlanta Falcons: Sterling Hofrichter, P, Syracuse

Pauline’s Ranking: #190 (P3) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #262 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Sterling Hofrichter was my third rated punter and has the leg strength and directional punting ability to make a roster this fall.

DiCecco: 

227. Chicago Bears: Lachavious Simmons, G, Tennessee State

Pauline’s Ranking: #795 (G63) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Lachavious Simmons is a massive blocker experienced at both tackle spots.  He’s strong, powerful, and dominant but he must really improve his fundamentals. Considering his upside, I could see Simmons making his way on to a practice squad this fall.

DiCecco: 

226. Chicago Bears: Arlington Hambright, G, Colorado

Pauline’s Ranking: #740 (G56) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 9.66

Pauline: Arlington Hambright played left tackle at Colorado and caught late steam as a projected guard. He has a compact build and blocks with solid fundamentals.  Hambright offers potential as a developmental zone-blocking guard.

DiCecco: Arlington Hambright is a well-traveled offensive tackle that will likely need to kick inside to make a roster. The potential is there, however.

225. Minnesota Vikings: Kenny Willekes, DE, Michigan State

Pauline’s Ranking: #168 (DE13) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #160 | RAS: 7.27

Pauline: Kenny Willekes is an average athlete with marginal size and speed. Yet, he’s been a resilient college defensive end who plays with infectious intensity.

DiCecco: Many pegged Kenny Willekes as an early day three prospect, but he doesn’t have much to offer when it comes to physical traits and his athleticism is marginal.

224. Tennessee Titans: Cole McDonald, QB, Hawaii

Pauline’s Ranking: #276 (QB15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #222 | RAS: 9.01

Pauline: Cole McDonald was super productive for Hawaii and comes with next-level size.  He needs work on his entire game and McDonald’s poor pass placement may leave him on the outside looking in on cut down day.

DiCecco: Cole McDonald is the class late-round flier, as he has an intriguing skill set to work with, but he is far from a polished product and may struggle to adjust to the pro game with an abbreviated offseason. Practice squad candidate.

223. Jacksonville Jaguars: Chris Claybrooks, CB, Memphis

Pauline’s Ranking: N/A |
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 7.43

Pauline: The seventh-round selection of Chris Claybrooks is a bit of a surprise.  He’s average at best at cornerback but Claybrooks is a sensational return specialist- the reason why he was drafted.

DiCecco: Claybrooks spent two years at Fort Scott Community College before transferring to Memphis, where he had modest production in 21 games, but dazzled as a return specialist.

222. Arizona Cardinals: Eno Benjamin, RB, Arizona State

Pauline’s Ranking: #108 (RB06) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #111 | RAS: 5.8

Pauline: Eno Benjamin finally comes off the board and is a terrific fit in Arizona.  Size and speed aside, Benjamin is a tough inside runner with the ability to get around tackle.  He’s also a terrific pass catcher that does the job blocking.

DiCecco: Surprised Eno Benjamin lasted this long, but the Cardinals finally scoop him up. Though not what many would deem to be a flashy runner, Benjamin has a balanced skill set and should do well in a committee approach at the next level.

221. Carolina Panthers: Stantley Thomas-Oliver, CB, Florida International

Pauline’s Ranking: #487 (CB51) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #120 | RAS: 8.26

Pauline: Carolina gets another athletic cornerback who needs to polish his game in Stantley Thomas-Oliver III.  The FIU product comes with terrific size and speed but is someone who must really improve his ball skills and learn to make plays with his back to the ball.

DiCecco:Stanley Thomas-Oliver has good size and speed, and flashed his skill set against some of the nation’s top talent at the Shrine Bowl. He will need to learn the finer nuances of the cornerback position in order for sustained success at the next level, but there is a lot to like with the FIU alum.

220. Los Angeles Chargers: K.J. Hill, WR, Ohio State

Pauline’s Ranking: #95 (WR17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #120 | RAS: 3.92

Pauline: The Chargers grab the last highly-rated player who really slipped through the cracks.  K.J. Hill is a terrific receiver with terrible size/speed numbers.  Don’t be surprised if he develops into a solid fourth wideout on the depth chart.

DiCecco: The LA Chargers add Ohio State’s K.J. Hill to bolster their receiving corps. I like Hill’s skill set, as his route running is advanced, he ran a diverse route tree, and he has a reliable pair on hands. Should carve out a depth role in training camp.

219. Baltimore Ravens: Geno Stone, S, Iowa

Pauline’s Ranking: #248 (S21) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #208 | RAS: 3.75

Pauline: In Geno Stone, the Ravens get a fierce, explosive safety who is best when making plays up the field. Stone should be a solid special teams player.

DiCecco: I really like Geno Stone’s pro prospects, even more than K’Von Wallace. Explosive centerfielder that scans the field extremely well and has the physicality to attack downhill. I see Stone as a core special teams performer in Year 1.

218. New York Giants: Carter Coughlin, LB, Minnesota

Pauline’s Ranking: #246 (OLB21) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #261 | RAS: 9.81

Pauline: The Giants get a potentially solid pass-rushing linebacker in Carter Coughlin.  He’s tough, plays disciplined football, and ran much faster than expected at the combine.  With the proper coaching and continued development, he could make the active roster this season.

DiCecco: Carter Coughlin is a tad undersized for the edge rusher role that he occupied for the Gophers, and will likely be a linebacker in the NFL. The 6’3″ 236 pounder ran a 4.54-second 40-yard dash at the NFL Scouting Combine and appeared fluid enough during the on-field portion of the drills to feasibly make the transition.

217. San Francisco 49ers: Jauan Jennings, WR, Tennessee

Pauline’s Ranking: #568 (WR80) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 2.74

Pauline: Jauan Jennings is a big-bodied possession wideout who wins out for the contested grab. He lacks speed, struggles to separate, and drops too many catchable throws.

DiCecco:

216. Washington Redksins: Kamren Curl, S, Arkansas

Pauline’s Ranking: #370 (S30) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #245 | RAS: 7.42

Pauline: The Redskins seventh-round pick Kamren Curl is an aggressive, run defending safety who works hard to get involved in the action.  He needs to improve his ball skills and more than anything else, show ability on special teams this summer.

DiCecco:

215. Cincinnati Bengals: Markus Bailey, LB, Purdue

Pauline’s Ranking: #294 (ILB15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #245 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Another linebacker for the Bengals who take Markus Bailey to start off the final round.  Bailey is a vicious run defender with excellent size and someone highly rated coming into the 2019 season, which he missed out on with a knee injury.

DiCecco: The Bengals add yet another linebacker, and get terrific value in Purdue’s Markus Bailey. Bailey has played a lot of football over his Boilermakers career, and had it not been for the injury, would have gone much higher. Tackling machine with an innate ability to diagnose plays and find the football.

2020 NFL Draft – Round 6

214. Seattle Seahawks: Freddie Swain, WR, Florida

Pauline’s Ranking: #360 (WR50) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 8.3

Pauline: Freddie Swain comes with next-level size and speed. He’s flashed pass-catching skill and comes with return potential.

DiCecco: Of the quartet of draft-able Florida wide receivers, I felt Swain needed the most development. He is slippery and elusive after the catch and contribute in the return game, but his must be more consistent in his route running and avoid body catches.

213. Indianapolis Colts: Jordan Glasgow, OLB, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #415 (OLB38) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Though not a great athlete, in Jordan Glasgow, the Colts get an intense hybrid safety/linebacker and potential special teams ace.

DiCecco: Jordan Glasgow doesn’t offer much upside, but the Colts get a potential sub-package hybrid defender late in the draft.

212. Indianapolis Colts: Dezmon Patmon, WR, Washington State

Pauline’s Ranking: #202 (WR30) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #207 | RAS: 8.47

Pauline: The Colts add another big-bodied receiver in Dezmon Patmon. The Wazzu product is a sensational athlete who had solid production but must really improve his route running and learn an NFL style of play.

DiCecco: Dezmon Patmon adds size and speed to the Colts receiving corps. The Washington State product must get stronger, work on his releases, and clean up drops, but has the catch radius and ball skills wo make plays down the field for Philip Rivers if he can snag a roster spot.

211. Indianapolis Colts: Isaiah Rodgers, CB, Massachusetts

Pauline’s Ranking: #534 (CB55) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A| RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Colts go for speed in Isaiah Rodgers, a solid cornerback with return skills who ran 4.27 seconds during a private pro day.

DiCecco: The Colts add play-making cornerback Isaiah Rodgers, who finished his senior season with four interceptions and 10 pass breakups. Incredibly fast player.

Inside The Draft 5:20 pm ET (via Pauline) | I’m told by sources close to the situation one of the prime reasons the Jets traded their sixth round selection to the Colts for Quincy Wilson was they coveted Cal inside linebacker Evan Weaver at the pick.  Weaver was selected 9 picks before the Jets were called to the clock.
TRADE ALERT: Colts trade with the Jets | The Colts have traded Quincy Wilson for the New York Jets’ 211th pick.

210. Philidelphia Eagles: Prince Tega Wanogho, OT, Auburn

Pauline’s Ranking: #69 (OT11) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #71 | RAS:

Pauline: Prince Tega Wanogho finally comes off the board after dropping much further than expected.  He an athletic pass blocker with starting potential at left tackle but was medically red-flagged.

DiCecco: Eagles add yet another Auburn offensive tackle in Prince Tega Wanogho. PTW is a talented, albeit raw prospect that is a bit of a late bloomer to the sport. The Auburn product is a fluid-mover in space and has the requisite athleticism.

209. Green Bay Packers: Simon Stepaniak, G, Indiana

Pauline’s Ranking: #349 (G23) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Though I graded Simon Stepaniak just outside of draftable I can see why the Packers liked him.  He’s a tough, nasty, small area blocker with terrific strength at the point- but don’t expect Stepaniak to stray too far from the line of scrimmage and effectively block in motion.

DiCecco: Stepaniak can play both guard spots and plays with good upper body strength and hand usage. Good fit in Green Bay. Can develop into an eventual starter in time.

208. Green Bay Packers: Jake Hanson, C, Oregon

Pauline’s Ranking: #268 (C10) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #249 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Jake Hanson was a consistent force for Oregon who can line up at center or guard. He’s tough as nails and gets the most from his ability but Hanson is a limited athlete with marginal upside.

DiCecco: Jake Hanson was an All-Pac-12 performer last season had started 49 games at center. Hanson adds value with his flexibility to play guard. Doesn’t offer much upside, and I view his ceiling as a spot-starter.

207. Buffalo Bills: Isaiah Hodgins, WR, Oregon State

Pauline’s Ranking: #224 (WR33) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #192 | RAS: 7.57

Pauline: The Bills get another big-bodied receiver for Josh Allen in Isaiah Hodgins. The OSU junior was known for making incredible catches that found it’s way into highlight tapes. But the fact is he’s slow, can’t run routes and struggles to separate.

DiCecco: Buffalo continues to add offensive weapons for Josh Allen, adding Oregon State’s Isaiah Hodgins. Hodgins does not run well, so separating with consistency is a concern. Not well versed as a route runner either, so I think a year one the practice squad could be in store.

206. Jacksonville Jaguars: Tyler Davis, TE, Georgia Tech

Pauline’s Ranking: #987 (TE54) | 
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: 7.89

Pauline: Tight end Tyler Davis is a size prospect who flashed limited ability yet someone whose game was never developed at Georgia Tech.

DiCecco:

205. Minnesota Vikings: Josh Metellus, S, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #197 (S15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #241 | RAS: 7.77

Pauline: Josh Metellus is very much like others who played the safety position at Michigan- tough, instinctive, and someone who gets the most from his ability.  He lacks prototypical size and speed but could be a good fit as a fourth zone safety.

DiCecco: This is about where I had Metellus slotted. The Michigan product has good size for the position and is at his best as a disruptive, downhill presence. He does not have top-end speed to cover a lot of ground, but should find a role of special teams and sub-package player.

204. New England Patriots: Cassh Maluia, OLB, Wyoming

Pauline’s Ranking: #606 (OLB52) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #| RAS:

Pauline: If there ever was a typical Patriots selection it comes in the form of Cassh Maluia. A player few sources, other than Pro Football Network, grades or has a scouting report on, Maluia was drafted for as much his potential on special teams/coverage units rather than his ability at linebacker.

DiCecco:

203. Minnesota Vikings: Blake Brandel, OT, Oregon State

Pauline’s Ranking: #574 (OT33) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: | RAS: 7.21

Pauline: I’ve had Oregon State left tackle Blake Brandel on my scouting radar since his sophomore season. And while he’s shown solid traits and ability at times, he really never improved off the 2017 film as I expected.

DiCecco: Brandel was an All-Pac-12 second-team performer a season ago and finished his Beavers career with 48 straight starts, but projects as a project tackle that could stand to add since to his frame.

202. Arizona Cardinals: Evan Weaver, LB, California

Pauline’s Ranking: #196 (ILB09) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #184 | RAS: 6.26

Pauline: If you were looking for a dominant two down defender who plays with a violent nature, few were better than Evan Weaver at this point in the draft.  Weaver possesses outstanding instincts and is outstanding making plays up the field or between the numbers.

DiCecco: Cal’s Evan Weaver doesn’t have the sideline-to-sideline speed that most teams covet in order to keep pace with the high-flying offenses that have become so prevalent, but he will flourish as a two-down linebacker, relying on instincts and football intelligence.

201. Baltimore Ravens: James Proche, WR, SMU

Pauline’s Ranking: #156 (WR24) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #163 | RAS: 4.07

Pauline: Receiver James Proche was not the biggest or the fastest rather just a consistent pass catcher who got the most from his ability. He was great value here for the Ravens and will be a very good fourth receiver in the NFL.

DiCecco: The Ravens add a receiver who may have the surest hands in the class in SMU’s James Proche. He doesn’t possess great size or speed, but he is a savvy route runner that has an innate feel for space and has the ball skills to reel in any throw. Tough as nails and dependable, Proche is a perfect fit with the Ravens.

200. Philadelphia Eagles: Quez Watkins, WR, Southern Mississippi

Pauline’s Ranking: #233 (WR34) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #209 | RAS: 7.42

Pauline: The Eagles continue to add speed to the receiver unit by selecting Quez Watkins.  The junior was insanely productive last season then blistered the forty at the combine, timing 4.35 seconds. He needs to improve his route tree and Watkins is not yet NFL ready, but I could see him on a practice squad this fall.

DiCecco: The Eagles add their third wide receiver this afternoon, this time it’s the speedy Quez Watkins from Southern Mississippi. Watkins has game-breaking speed, but develop as a route runner. Developmental prospect with upside.

199. Los Angeles Rams: Jordan Fuller, S, Ohio State

Pauline’s Ranking: #210 (S16) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #234 | RAS: 5.53

Pauline: Jordan Fuller is another tough, instinctive safety who comes up shy in the areas of speed and athleticism. He was consistent for three years at Ohio State and I expect Fuller to be a good ninth defensive back on Sunday.

DiCecco: I had Jordan Fuller graded as a PFA, as he lacks the desired explosiveness and athleticism, but he has played consistently at a high-level for the Buckeyes. He’ll excel as a special teams performer.

198. Pittsburgh Steelers: Antoine Brooks Jr., S, Maryland

Pauline’s Ranking: #173 (S14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #164 | RAS: 6.25

Pauline: I’ve described Antoine Brooks Jr. as having better ball skills than former UM safety and 2019 first-round pick Darnell Savage. What Brooks lacks is the sheer athleticism and speed of Savage. Still, he will make a real good #3 safety in the NFL.

DiCecco: Antoine Brooks isn’t the versatile defender that Darnell Savage is, but he plays a much more physical style. Though a bit stiff in coverage, Brooks is an exceptional tackler and has the requisite range to see the field in sub-packages in 2020.

197. Detroit Lions: John Penisini, DT, Utah

Pauline’s Ranking: #176 (DT16) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #214 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: John Penisini makes up for his lack of size and athleticism with fundamentally sound, intense play. He possesses the all-out mentality teammate Leki Fotu does not. He gets the most from his ability and I have no doubt Pensini will have a long NFL career.

DiCecco: Like Bravvion Roy, John Penisini is another interior defender that is built low to the ground and plays with outstanding leverage. He gave blockers fits throughout the week with his play-strength and burst off the ball.

196. Philidelphia Eagles: Shaun Bradley, LB, Temple

Pauline’s Ranking: #205 (ILB10) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #195 | RAS: 7.74

Pauline: For more than a year I have referred to Shaun Bradley as the most underrated linebacker in the nation.  He’s athletic, explosive but also instinctive.  While he didn’t produce as hoped in 2019, it wasn’t due to lack of effort or poor play. Prediction, Bradley will turn out to be a better LB than third-round selection Davion Taylor.

DiCecco: Earlier this week, I had a conversation with Seth Joyer, who mentioned he coached Temple linebacker Shaun Bradley at the NFLPA Collegiate Bowl and spoke highly of him. I like Bradley’s explosiveness and ability to diagnose plays. I agree with Tony: Bradley has the intangibles to become a better LB than Davion Taylor.

195. New England Patriots: Justin Herron, G, Wake Forest

Pauline’s Ranking: #211 (G13) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #203 | RAS: 3.99

Pauline: The Patriots always seem to select slightly undersized but athletic offensive linemen and that’s exactly what they got in Justin Herron. The left tackle for Wake Forest, Herron easily moves about the field and could play guard or tackle in a zone-blocking scheme.

DiCecco:New England adds undersized Wake Forest tackle Justin Herron, who may be better served to slide inside to guard. Savvy lineman that should grow into a dependable player in Foxborough.

194. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Khalil Davis, DR, Nebraska

Pauline’s Ranking: #188 (DT17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #190 | RAS: 9.81

Pauline: The Bucs get one of the most athletic defensive tackles in the draft by selecting Khalil Davis.  More of a one-gap perpetrator who has shown consistent progress in his game, Davis was brilliant during Shrine Game practices.

DiCecco: Tampa Bay lands Shrine Bowl stud and interior sparkplug Khalil Davis. Davis is an extremely quick and twitchy defensive lineman that makes up for his lack of length with speed and leverage. Like the pick.

193. Indianapolis Colts: Rob Windsor, DT, Penn State

Pauline’s Ranking: #145 (DT14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #168 | RAS: 8.68

Pauline: The Colts hit it out of the park again selecting Robert Windsor in the sixth round.  Windsor is fourth-round value and a great combination of size, speed, and intensity.

DiCecco: The Colts take Robert Windsor, an undersized interior defensive lineman that earned a starting role in 2018, receiving honorable mention All-Big Ten honors and third-team All-Big Ten recognition in successive seasons. He is a high-effort player, but likely destined for a rotational role.

192. Green Bay Packers: Jon Runyan, G, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #231 (G14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #247 | RAS: 8.46

Pauline: Jon Runyan is a smart, tough blocker with the versatility to line up at guard or tackle.  He will be an inexpensive utility blocker at the next level and eighth offensive lineman.

DiCecco: The Packers add Jon Runyan. Though he thrived as a Big Ten tackle, his lack of length likely translates to a guard at the next level. Intelligent player, detail-oriented, locks onto defenders.

191. New York Jets: Braden Mann, P, Texas A&M

Pauline’s Ranking: #165 (P1) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #236 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Jets get the top punter in the draft selecting Braden Mann. The TAMU kicks moonshots and flips the field. I would be shocked if he’s not the starting punter this season.

DiCecco: The Jets add the draft’s top punter in Braden Mann. 54.3 percent of his punts traveled over 50 yards.

190. San Francisco 49ers: Charlie Woerner, TE, Georgia

Pauline’s Ranking: #265 (TE15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #272 | RAS: 6.93

Pauline: Charlie Woerner is a solid complementary tight end who could make a depth chart as the number three. He’s solid in all areas yet spectacular in none.

DiCecco: I had Charlie Woerner graded as a PFA. Doesn’t many things well, though nothing I would consider exceptional. Appreciate his blocking ability and competitive nature. Could stick as a TE3.

189. Jacksonville Jaguars: Jake Luton, QB, Oregon State

Pauline’s Ranking: #180 (QB9) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #179 | RAS: 2.01

Pauline: I mentioned last week Jake Luton was moving up draft boards and more and more teams were turned on by his potential. He’s a classic pocket passer with terrific size and a next-level arm.  More of a developmental prospect, I could see Luton making a roster as a third QB.

DiCecco: Jags make an interesting selection in Oregon State’s Jake Luton, who boasts prototypical size for the position and comes from a pro-style system at Oregon State. He has an above-average arm and fits the ball into tight throwing windows on intermediate routes. Takes care of the football.

188. Buffalo Bills: Tyler Bass, K, Georgia Southern

Pauline’s Ranking: #206 (PK1) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #257 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Tyler Bass was universally graded as the top kicked in this draft as he possesses a decent leg and is effective on kick-offs as well as field goals.

DiCecco: Another kicker comes off the board, this time it’s Georgia Southern’s Tyler Bass. I gave a Bass a seventh-round grade, but he connected on 93 percent of his kicks from 30 to 50 yards last season and has enough leg to regularly boot the ball out of the end zone for touchbacks. So there’s that.

187. Cleveland Browns: Donovan Peoples-Jones, WR, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #104 (WR18) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #101 | RAS: 9.63

Pauline: Donovan Peoples-Jones finally comes off the board as the Browns swipe him up.  I always had Peoples-Jones graded lower than most and even my fourth round grade was two rounds earlier than he went.  The Wolverine junior has next-level size and speed but never really put it together on the field.

DiCecco: Peoples-Jones was too much of a projection to take on Day 2, but the kind of player teams generally roll the dice on late in the draft. He never lived up to his potential at Michigan and his route running leaves much to be desired, but there is no denying his impressive frame and ball skills. Project player with upside.

186. Los Angeles Chargers: Alohi Gilman, S, Notre Dame

Pauline’s Ranking: #158 (S13) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #161 | RAS: 3.8

Pauline: There was some talk Alohi Gilman could be selected earlier in day three but his combine forty time of 4.61 killed it. Gilman is a terrific football player with next-level instincts. He possesses solid cover skills and could line up in packages that use three safeties.

DiCecco: I like Gillman and although he did not run well at the Combine, I think his play-speed trumps that. He can cover and plays with good anticipation. Chargers land a third-safety late into Day 3.

185. Miami Dolphins: Blake Ferguson, LS, LSU

Pauline’s Ranking: | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Miami lands top long-snapper in Blake Ferguson to fortify their special teams unit.

DiCecco: 

184. Carolina Panthers: Bravvion Roy, DT, Baylor

Pauline’s Ranking: #238 (DT23) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #215 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Panthers continue to load up on defensive lineman and got a good one in Bravvion Roy. A massive interior lineman who’s very athletic for a 328-pounder, Roy is impossible to move off the point and also makes plays on the ball. He must improve his fundamentals and consistently play with proper knee bend, but Roy has a big upside.

DiCecco: Bravvion Roy was a Shrine Bowl standout. He is built low to the ground, but has an impressively strong base and plays with good pad level. Offensive lineman struggled with his quickness and burst off the ball. He has spot starter potential, but will likely be a key depth piece on a loaded Carolina defensive front.

183. New York Giants: Cameron Brown, OLB, Penn State

Pauline’s Ranking: #160 (OLB16) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #176 | RAS: 6.05

Pauline: Cam Brown entered the season graded as a potential 3rd round pick but did not meet expectations as a senior.  That being the case, he’s a perfect fit for the Giants and an athletic linebacker who shows great range on the field.  Brown needs to get bigger and must get his game back to where it was in 2018.

DiCecco: Cam Brown is a long linebacker that must add size in order to disengage from blocks at the next level. He has plenty of speed and lateral agility, but he must improve his play-strength in order to withstand the rigors that come with playing the position.

182. New England Patriots: Mike Onwenu, G, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #302 (G20) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #166 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Though I graded Michael Onwenu as a PFA, I love this pick for the Patriots. He’s a massive, wide-bodied blocker who annihilates opponents once he gets his hands on them.  Onwenu needs to shed some poundage and improve his fundamentals but he comes with an upside.

DiCecco: I had Onwenu pegged for the seventh round, but leave it to the Patriots to see the value in a prospect. Onwenu is a road-grader that flatten anything in his path. If the New England can refine his skill set and make him a more technically savvy lineman, they may have something.

181. Denver Broncos: Netane Muti, G, Fresno State

Pauline’s Ranking: #398 (G25) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #90 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: There were many in the scouting community who liked Netane Muti of Fresno State, though I was not one of them.  He’s a nasty, wide-bodied blocker with limited athleticism, upside potential, and Muti comes off injury.

DiCecco: Fresno State’s Netane Muti is another interior lineman I was high on, and grouped with Clemson’s John Simpson. He doesn’t offer much in terms of athleticism, but I liked him for what he is — a powerful mauler.

180. Cincinnati Bengals: Hakeem Adeniji, OT, Kansas

Pauline’s Ranking: #162 (OT14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #134 | RAS: 7.81

Pauline: Hakeem Adeniji is an athletic college tackle many project to guard. He’s tough, strong, moves well on his feet but needs more consistency with his fundamentals.

DiCecco: Hakeem Adeniji went a bit earlier than I expected, as he has intriguing physical traits, but is far from a finished product. Not sure his technique projects as an NFL tackle, but rather an athletic guard.

2020 NFL Draft – Round 5

179. Dallas Cowboys: Bradlee Anae, DE, Utah

Pauline’s Ranking: #71 (DE7) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #66 | RAS: 5

Pauline: A poor workout at the combine and character concerns pushed Bradlee Anae much deeper into the draft than anyone thought. But on the field, he’s a terrific edge rusher who looks and plays more athletic than his numbers would lend one to believe.

DiCecco: Hard to fathom that Bradley Anae has tumbled this far, but here we are. The Utah pass rusher didn’t test well in Indianapolis and lacks the desired length for the position, but should carve out a role as a situational edge rusher.

178. Denver Broncos: Justin Strnad, LB, Wake Forest

Pauline’s Ranking: #166 (OLB17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #172 | RAS: 3.85

Pauline: Justin Strnad is one of the hidden gems at linebacker in this draft.  An athletic run and chase defender, he’s outstanding in pursuit and plays much faster than his forty time.

DiCecco: Wake Forest’s Justin Strnad is another overlooked linebacker prospect that has consistent production to his name and innate athleticism that should earn him a defensive role as a first-year player.

177. Kansas City Chiefs: Michael Danna, Edge, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #290 (DE19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Mike Danna had an up and down season at Michigan but was tremendous during Shrine Game practices.  He’s an athletic pass rusher who can come out of a three-point stance or stand over tackle.  Fundamentally sound, I could see Dana making a roster as a situational pass rusher.

DiCecco: The Chiefs elect to go with Michigan’s Mike Danna — who was a handful to block during Shrine week. Though I’m not particularly high on Danna’s pro prospects, he gives great effort and plays with good technique. Not sure he ever becomes more than a depth component, but he should be able to make the roster as a rookie.

176. Minnesota Vikings: K.J. Osborn, WR, Miami

Pauline’s Ranking: #270 (WR39) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #295| RAS: 8

Pauline: While people kept mentioning the name of Jeff Thomas, it was obvious K.J. Osborn was far and away the best receiver for the Miami Hurricanes last season. He’s a reliable pass catcher with decent size and Osborn ran better than expected at the combine.

DiCecco: The Vikings get their speed receiver in Miami’s K.J. Osborn. Osborn, who blew the doors off of the NFL Combine, fits as a slot receiver and return specialist, but has struggled with concentration drops and must develop as a route runner to find success at the next level.

175. Green Bay Packers: Kamal Martin, OLB, Minnesota

Pauline’s Ranking: #167 (OLB18) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #204| RAS: N/A

Pauline: I love the Packers selection of Kamal Martin in round five. He’s a true run and chase linebacker who gives it his all and plays with a violent attitude. I could see Martin making the roster as a back-up linebacker then turning into a special teams/coverage unit demon.

DiCecco: Kamal Martin was a key member to Minnesota’s defense and has largely gone overlooked throughout the draft process. He plays with a downhill, aggressive mentality. He will be a training camp standout and stick as a glue-guy on special teams.

174. Tennessee Titans: Larrell Murchison, DT, North Carolina State

Pauline’s Ranking: #213 (DT20) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #173| RAS: 7.1

Pauline: The Titans wanted to come out of the draft with a two-gap lineman and that’s exactly what Larrell Murchison can do. He possesses the size and power to line up in a 3-man front but I question his motor and Murchison did not live up to expectations in 2019.

DiCecco:

173. Chicago Bears: Darnell Mooney, WR, Tulane

Pauline’s Ranking: #448 (WR60) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A| RAS: 7.04

Pauline: The Bears get an interesting prospect in Darnell Mooney. Well-liked in scouting circles, he’s a big-play receiver with return skills.  Yet Mooney’s pass-catching production has never been anything but ordinary. He offers great upside and could make a roster as a 5th receiver/return specialist.

DiCecco: Darnell Mooney from Tulane is a player I’ve been high on as a diminutive deep threat that doubles as a game-breaking return specialist. He should fit well in Chicago’s offense.

172. Detroit Lions: Jason Huntley, RB, New Mexico State

Pauline’s Ranking: #545 (RB43) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A| RAS: 8.07

Pauline: Jason Huntley is a name not well known to those outside the scouting community. He’s a quick, creative ball carrier who works hard running on the inside while possessing the speed necessary to turn the perimeter. He turned in a terrific pro-day workout and will be a good third-down back at the next level.

DiCecco: Lions make a surprising selection, opting to go with New Mexico State running back Jason Huntley. Huntley isn’t the biggest, but is extremely shifty and runs hard and has the elusiveness to turn the corner and run to daylight. Intriguing selection.

171. Houston Texans: Isaiah Coulter, WR, Rhode Island

Pauline’s Ranking: #249 (WR36) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #282 | RAS: 6.71

Pauline: While the fifth round was a little early for Isaiah Coulter, in my opinion, this was still a solid selection by the Texans. Coulter is a long-limbed pass catcher with a fluid style and reliable game. He ran relatively well at the combine and could develop into a fourth receiver in the NFL.

DiCecco: Coulter entered the draft a year early after a breakout junior campaign. He is a raw receiving talent, but possess a higher ceiling than most available players. Coulter becomes the first Rhode Island draftee since 1986.

170. Baltimore Ravens: Broderick Washington, DT, Texas Tech

Pauline’s Ranking: #229 (DT22) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #231 | RAS: 8.24

Pauline: Broderick Washington Jr. was graded as a fourth prospect before the season but his play never improved.  He’s an explosive first step lineman with solid size but Washington must get stronger and add some bulk to his frame.

DiCecco: Texas Tech’s Broderick Washington started off his college career strong but never took his performance to the next level. Good size and burst for the position, but projects as a rotational player.

169. Minnesota Vikings: Harrison Hand, CB, Temple

Pauline’s Ranking: #240 (CB28) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #205 | RAS: 8.24

Pauline: The Vikings continue to remake their secondary by adding their third cornerback of the draft in Harrison Hand.  A developing prospect with terrific size and speed, Hand comes off a real good junior campaign.  He’s still rough around the edges but with proper coaching, Hand could develop into a dime back.

DiCecco: Harrison Hand is one of my top-rated Day 3 defensive backs. Beginning his career at Baylor, Hand transferred to Temple last season. Hand has imposing size and physical traits, but is still a bit raw and will need some time. Starter upside.

168. Philadelphia Eagles: John Hightower, WR, Boise State

Pauline’s Ranking: #163 (WR25) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #171 | RAS: 8.03

Pauline: The Eagles add another speed receiver in John Hightower.  The Boise State senior has terrific upside and flashes next level ability yet never fully translated his athletic skills into football production.

DiCecco: The Eagles vowed to prioritize speed on offense, and snag Boise State burner John Hightower at 168. Hightower spent his first two seasons at the junior college level and is still developing, but averaged 18.5 yards per catch for the Broncos.

167. Buffalo Bills: Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia

Pauline’s Ranking: #135 (QB08) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #126 | RAS: 1.94

Pauline: Many may be surprised Jake Fromm was selected this late- but I’m not one of them.  I consistently had Fromm as a 4th/5th round selection and while he was a solid QB on the college level, Fromm does not project well to the NFL.

DiCecco: The Bills add former Georgia signal-caller Jake Fromm. While Fromm doesn’t possess great size or arm strength, his football IQ is considered to be off the charts and his poise and leadership are unparalleled. Fromm has played in some big games for the Bulldogs over the years but doesn’t have the skill set that typically translates to NFL starter.

166. Detroit Lions: Quintex Cephus, WR, Wisconsin

Pauline’s Ranking: #170 (WR26) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #155 | RAS: 4.54

Pauline: Quintez Cephus flashed brilliance and dominance at Wisconsin when he was on the field. But character concerns, as well as a horrific forty time at the combine, pushed him into the late rounds.  If Cephus keeps his focus on the field he will be a good number three wideout in the NFL.

DiCecco: The Lions add another big-bodied receiver to team with Kenny Golladay. Cephus did not run well at the NFL Combine, but has decent build-up speed and is a terror after the catch. Not sure if he becomes a starter in 2020, but could develop into one sooner than later.

165. Jacksonville Jaguars: Collin Johnson, WR, Texas

Pauline’s Ranking: #107 (WR19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #123 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Collin Johnson finally comes off the board as the Jaguars selected him in round five.  At his best Johnson is a big-bodied game controlling wideout.  Johnson fell because he was not at his best in 2019 and his play disappointed scouts. There’s also concern the big-bodied receiver from the Big 12 will struggle separation at the next level.

DiCecco: Like Collin Johnson’s size, as he plays an ‘above the rim’ style of football, but he doesn’t have long speed and could struggle to create separation at the top of his routes at the next level.

164. Miami Dolphins: Curtis Weaver, Edge, Boise State

Pauline’s Ranking: #54 (OLB5) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #76 | RAS: 7.66

Pauline: After tumbling two to three rounds later than expected, Curtis Weaver is finally swiped off the board by the Miami Dolphins.  At the top of his game in 2018, Weaver was a dominant game-changing pass rusher but he was overweight and sluggish in 2019. If he gets back in track the Dolphins got a steal.

DiCecco: Boise State’s Curtis Weaver’s fall ends. The remarkably productive edge rusher struggled with weight issues and inconsistencies last season, likely raising some concerns. If he can regain the focus he showed earlier in his career, the Dolphins landed a gem.

163. Chicago Bears: Kindle Vildor, CB, Georgia Southern

Pauline’s Ranking: #143 (CB17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #149 | RAS: 7.62

Pauline: The Bears select a terrific cornerback in Kindle Vildor.  He’s a feisty defensive back best facing the action and someone who can line up in nickel packages in zone coverage.

DiCecco: 

162. Washington Redskins: Khaleke Hudson, LB, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #142 (OLB13) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #169 | RAS: 7.58

Pauline: The Redskins select an interesting prospect in Khaleke Hudson.  He’s a hybrid safety/outside linebacker with terrific athleticism and an aggressive game.  Considered a top prospect after his sophomore season, Hudson never really progressed and has coverage concerns.

DiCecco: Like the Redskins pick of Michigan hybrid safety/linebacker Khaleke Hudson, as he has intriguing athletic traits and exceptional range. A bit of an awkward build at 5-11, 225, but I envision Hudson as a special teams ace from Day 1 and eventual sub-package player.

161. Tampa Bay Buccaneers: Tyler Johnson, WR, Minnesota

Pauline’s Ranking: #123 (WR23) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #112 | RAS: 2.89

Pauline: Tyler Johnson is finally off the board, selected by the Bucs in the fifth round.  While many touted Johnson as a potential top 45 pick at points last season, Johnson was not getting love in the scouting community.  He was a terrific college receiver who was his own worst enemy in the pre-draft process.  After being snubbed by the Senior Bowl, Johnson pulled out of the Shrine Game and never ran at the combine, despite concerns about his forty time.

DiCecco: Tyler Johnson endured an unusual pre-draft process, which began with skipping the East-West Shrine Bowl, but there’s no denying his high-point skills and innate ability to come up with contested catches. Think Johnson can become a strong third receiver.

160. Cleveland Browns, Nick Harris, C, Washington

Pauline’s Ranking: #119 (C5) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #205 | RAS: 6.78

Pauline: I mentioned yesterday center Nick Harris was all over draft boards and could be selected anywhere from as early as the third to as late as the fifth.  The Browns took him in the latter. In Harris, the team is getting a tough and smart center with size and growth limitations.

DiCecco: The Browns add a center that I’m surprised lasted this long. Harris doesn’t have a prototypical build for the positional, sporting a more compact build, but has played a lot of football at a high-level for Washington and plays with a scrappiness to his game.

159. New England Patriots, K, Justin Rohrwasser

Pauline’s Ranking: N/A | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A| RAS: N/A

Pauline:

DiCecco: In a somewhat surprising move, the Patriots add Marshall kicker Justin Rohrwasser.

158. New York Jets: Bryce Hall, CB, Virginia

Pauline’s Ranking: #207 (CB24) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #127 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Entering the season, Bryce Hall was graded as a third-round pick by scouts but a mid-year ankle injury ended any chance of a second-day selection. He’s a smart and tough cover man with terrific ball skills but speed limitations. Hall is also the type of player Gregg Williams will work wonders with.

DiCecco: The Jets are in dire need for competent cornerback play, and add the best available player in Bryce Hall. Had it not been for the early-season leg injury, Hall likely gets first-round consideration. Fluid, rangy perimeter player that also has the versatility to play some safety.

Update from Tony Pauline | As we move into the later rounds I expect the Jets to further address the receiver position at some point. Quartney Davis of Texas A&M will get consideration in the sixth round if he’s available and keep an eye on injured Georgia receiver Lawrence Cager. If the Jets don’t select Cager in the final frame I would expect them to make a run to sign the big-bodied wideout after the draft.”

157. Jacksonville Jaguars: Daniel Thomas, S, Auburn

Pauline’s Ranking: #216 (S17) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #218 | RAS: 8.41

Pauline: Daniel Thomas is a physical specimen with terrific size and speed. He’s an aggressive safety who plays with violence yet someone who’s a bit straight-linish and needs to improve his play in coverage.

DiCecco: Auburn’s Daniel Thomas is an interesting pick for Jacksonville. Thomas played a ton of football for the Tigers, lining up all over the back end, but has little ball production to show for it. He will likely serve as a developmental third safety and special teams dynamo as a rookie.

156. Washington Redskins: Keith Ismael, C, San Diego State

Pauline’s Ranking: #105 (C4) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #109 | RAS: 7.09

Pauline: Keith Ismael was an interesting selection by the Redskins. He’s a solid zone blocking center who plays with terrific vision and intensity. Ismael has been consistent and durable at SDSU and I’ll be interested to see what Washington has in store for him.

DiCecco: SDSU Keith Ismael is a center with guard versatility. Intelligent player, moves well in space, and is technically sound. Good pick here.

155. Chicago Bears: Trevis Gipson, DE, Tulsa

Pauline’s Ranking: #172 (DE14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #177 | RAS: 8.8

Pauline: In Trevis Gipson, the Bears get an athletic pass rusher who must find a position on the field. He has an upside and should be a solid 4-3 defensive end in time, but I struggle to see how Gipson fits the Bears 3-4 alignment.

DiCecco: Trevis Gipson was one of my top-rated late-round edge prospects. Gipson is still very much a work in progress but has solid length and traits to develop into a prominent rotational player. His best fit is likely as a 4-3 defensive end at the next level.

154. Miami Dolphins: Jason Strowbridge, DE, North Carolina

Pauline’s Ranking: #80 (DT9) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #117 | RAS: 9.48

Pauline: In Jason Strowbridge, the Dolphins are getting a day two talent who fell because of position uncertainty. Strowbridge was an insanely athletic, play-making defensive tackle at UNC who lacks size and bulk. In the end, this was a value pick that will reap dividends a year or two down the road.

DiCecco: I like Strowbridge’s length and athletic traits, but teams likely struggled to find a fit on the defensive line. The former Tarheel has impressive lateral agility and burst, but plays with inconsistent pad level and is sometimes slow to react.

153. San Francisco 49ers: Colton McKivitz, OT, West Virginia

Pauline’s Ranking: #155 (OT13) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #156 | RAS: 4.36

Pauline: The Niners make a trade and get one of the more underrated tackles in Colton McKivitz. A consistent three-year starter at WVU, McKivitz is not pretty or overly athletic rather a tough as nails blocker with great instincts. I expect him to have a long career in the NFL.

DiCecco: In light of Joe Staley’s retirement, the 49ers add West Virginia’s McKivitz to the tackle mix. He doesn’t possess the desired length or athleticism, but what he lacks in that, he more than makes up for with his physicality and toughness.

TRADE ALERT: 49ers trade with Dolphins | The San Francisco 49ers have traded up with the Dolphins. They will send RB Matt Brieda to the Dolphins in return.

152. Carolina Panthers: Kenny Robinson, S, West Virginia

Pauline’s Ranking: #139 (S10) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #140 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Kenny Robinson is one of the more interesting stories in this draft. A former West Virginia safety who I graded as a 5th round pick off the 2018 film, he was dismissed from the program after academic violations then went on to play a handful of games in the XFL. He’s a long, instinctive defensive back who could line up as a third safety on Sunday.

DiCecco: The West Virginia/XFL standout finds a home with the Carolina Panthers. Good size, and has an instinct that projects well for the defensive back position. He figures to fill a key depth role on game day for the Panthers.

151. Los Angeles Chargers: Joe Reed, WR, Virginia

Pauline’s Ranking: #181 (WR27) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #193 | RAS: 9.35

Pauline: The Chargers add speed and return skills with Joe Reed in round five. Coming off a terrific senior season, Reed nicely projects as a fourth receiver who can line up in the slot, on the boundary, and return punts.

DiCecco: The Chargers add the thickly-built Joe Reed to their explosive offense. While Reed made a name for himself at the college level as a go-to wide receiver and return specialist, I think he ultimate transitions to running back.

150. New York Giants: Shane Lemieux, G, Oregon

Pauline’s Ranking: #126 (G5) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #147 | RAS: 6.65

Pauline: The Giants continue to upgrade their offensive line, selecting Shane Lemieux in the fifth round. Lemieux has been a dominant lineman three years running and plays with a nasty, violent area. Despite his surprising workout at the combine, he plays best in confined quarters.

DiCecco: Giants add another body to their revamped offensive line, this time landing Lemieux. Like the tenacity and urgency he plays with, and his surprising workout at the Combine likely shot him up draft boards, as I had him pegged as a sixth-round talent.

149. Indianapolis Colts: Danny Pinter, G, Ball State

Pauline’s Ranking: #179 (G9) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #175 | RAS: 9.6

Pauline: In Danny Pinter, the Colts are getting an offensive line prospect some compare to Joe Thuney. An athletic college tackle, Pinter projects as a zone blocking guard at the next level and comes with terrific upside.

DiCecco: Danny Pinter has been a late-round sleeper of mine for a bit, as he has tantalizing athleticism. Doubt he plays tackle at next level, though. He has starter-upside as a guard.

148. Seattle Seahawks: Alton Robinson, DE, Syracuse

Pauline’s Ranking: #110 (DE9) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #137 | RAS: 8.94

Pauline: Alton Robinson of Syracuse has all the makings of a big-time pass rusher at the next level – he’s athletic, fluid, and incredibly agile. What he lacks is consistent play-making and Robinson disappears for stretches. He’ll contend for the LEO spot in Seattle’s defense and comes with tremendous upside.

DiCecco: Seattle adds another edge rusher, this time nabbing the upside-laden pass rusher from Syracuse Alton Robinson. Robinson had a down year compared to his 2018 season, and is still fairly raw, but has the physical traits to become a force as a rotational player as a rookie. Relentless, but must be more consistent game to game.

147. Cincinnati Bengals: Khalid Kareem, DE, Notre Dame

Pauline’s Ranking: #188 (DE10) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #110 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Khalid Kareem took a backseat to many of the headliners from the Notre Dame defense but he’s a legitimate NFL prospect. Kareem is explosive and very quick. He needs to improve his playing strength but I can see Kareem impacting as a rotational lineman for the Bengals.

DiCecco: Another Notre Dame edge rusher comes off the board, this time it’s Khalid Kareem. Kareem isn’t as explosive as Okwara, and his game is largely predicated on power and technique. High-level IQ and awareness should lead to Kareem being a key rotational player.

2020 NFL Draft – Round 4

146. Dallas Cowboys: Tyler Biadasz, C, Wisconsin

Pauline’s Ranking: #92 (C3) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #77 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: I mentioned two weeks prior to the draft that Tyler Biadasz was medically red-flagged by teams and this one-time potential first-round choice could fall out of the draft’s top 100 picks – which he did. When healthy and at the top of his game, Biadasz is an explosive zone blocking center with next level starting potential.

DiCecco: Dallas ends Biadasz’s free fall and gets tremendous value, as he former Badger would have likely been a second-round pick had it not been for the medical red flags. Biadasz has plug-and-play potential as Dallas continues to add to their offense.

TRADE ALERT: Cowboys trade with Eagles | The Dallas Cowboys have traded up with the Philadelphia Eagles. Eagles get No 164 and a fifth-rounder in 2021 for 146.

145. Philadelphia Eagles: Jack Driscoll, OT, Auburn

Pauline’s Ranking: #128 (G6) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #141 | RAS: 8.89

Pauline: The Eagles get one of the top lineman available in Jack Driscoll. A terrific right tackle for Auburn, I project Driscoll to guard and some even think that center is his best fit in the NFL. It’s interesting Driscoll was selected before his heralded teammate, Prince Tega Wanogho, who was medically red-flagged.

DiCecco: Eagles go with Auburn RT Jack Driscoll with their second fourth-round selection. Was impressed with Driscoll’s lateral movement at the Shrine Bowl. Four-year starter.

144. Seattle Seahawks: DeeJay Dallas, RB, Miami (FL)

Pauline’s Ranking: #320 (RB26) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A | RAS: 5.13

Pauline: While DeeJay Dallas will add depth to the Seahawks running back position, he’s not a prospect I’ve been high on watching the film. He’s been very spotty on the field and really doesn’t show any outstanding single trait to his game. Then again, Seattle always selects system players and it’s worked out for them.

DiCecco: The Seahawks get a newer, younger version of Chris Carson in Miami’s DeeJay Dallas. Dallas is one of the most punishing runners in this class, and his wide receiver background is evident in his fluidity as a pass-catcher. Had ball security issues early in his career that appears to have been rectified.

143. Baltimore Ravens: Ben Bredeson, G, Michigan

Pauline’s Ranking: #159 (G8) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #128 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Ben Bredeson is a terrific fit in Baltimore. Like many of the other guards selected in the fourth round he’s a tough, slug it out blocker best in a small area. I love his football intellect and though not the greatest athlete, Bredeson blocks with outstanding fundamentals.

DiCecco: The Ravens continue to build up the league’s most explosive offense by adding Michigan Ben Bredeson to bolster the interior of their offensive line. Bredeson was a four-year starter that plays with sound technique.

142. Washington Redskins: Antonio Gandy-Golden, WR, Liberty

Pauline’s Ranking: #137 (WR22) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #148 | RAS: 6.15

Pauline: Antonio Gandy-Golden is a big-bodied possession receiver who was everyone’s darling last season. He comes with reliable hands, the ability to win out for contested throws and Gandy-Golden is a terrific downfield blocker. What he lacks is speed and quickness, which will make it difficult for him to separate in the NFL.

DiCecco: Gandy-Golden is a bit of a polarizing prospect, even on Day 3. He doesn’t offer much speed but has the traits to become a dominant possession threat for Washington. He is raw and will need some work with his route running, but if he can put it all together, they’ll have a solid No. 2 receiving option.

140. Jacksonville Jaguars: Shaquille Quarterman, LB, Miami (FL)

Pauline’s Ranking: #228 (ILB11) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #216 | RAS: 4.79

Pauline: Shaquille Quarterman is an interesting selection for the Jaguars, a team that went linebacker heavy in free agency. Quarterman is a tough but limited linebacker- he’s a two-down defender that struggles making plays in pursuit and has been a liability in coverage.

DiCecco: Jacksonville adds Miami linebacker, Shaq Quarterman, to their linebacking corps, and I like the fit — but feel he could have been had later this afternoon. Quarterman struggled in coverage during Shrine practices but can quickly sniff out plays in the running game.

139. Las Vegas Raiders: Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech

Pauline’s Ranking: #101 (CB14) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #107 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: In Amik Robertson, the Raiders are getting a dynamic play-making cornerback with a nose for the ball. Size is the issue for Robertson but he comes with next-level ball skills.

DiCecco: Raiders surprisingly added the physical, gritty Damon Arnette on opening night and now add Robertson, an undersized, scrappy defender that is tough as nails. Robertson refuses to back down from any challenge and has outstanding instincts and plus ball skills.

138. Kansas City Chiefs: L’Jarius Sneed, S, Louisiana Tech

Pauline’s Ranking: #157 (S12) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #188 | RAS: 9.44

Pauline: I mentioned last week L’Jarius Sneed was getting a fourth-round mention and that’s where HE ended up. In Sneed, the Chiefs are getting an athletic defensive back who was a dynamic cornerback at Louisiana Tech as a sophomore and junior before being kicked inside to safety last season. He’s a dime back with scheme versatility.

DiCecco: The Chiefs add Sneed to their secondary. Sneed offers tantalizing athletic traits, and while he was announced as a safety, he could just as easily line up and find success as a press-corner.

137. Jacksonville Jaguars: Josiah Scott, CB, Michigan State

Pauline’s Ranking: #177 (CB21) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #167 | RAS: 8.05

Pauline: The Jags again address the cornerback spot selecting Josiah Scott in round four. And while I had him graded as a sixth-rounder, Scott has the skills and speed to line up in nickel/dime packages and also brings potential as a return specialist.

DiCecco: Jaguars surprisingly go with Josiah Scott over Bryce Hall, but they are getting a polished product that should contribute in sub-packages. I had him graded as a seventh-round talent.

136. Los Angeles Rams: Brycen Hopkins, TE, Purdue

Pauline’s Ranking: #103 (TE5) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #92 | RAS: 8.16

Pauline: In Brycen Hopkins, the Rams are getting a terrific athlete who still needs a lot of work on his game. Hopkins has the speed to split the seam and make the reception downfield. He also gives effort blocking but needs to take the next step in order to make an impact on Sunday.

DiCecco: The Rams add another tight end to their collection, and Hopkins may be the best of the group. I like Hopkins as a move tight end for McVay’s offense, and his advanced route running and plus athleticism should allow him to find the field early as a rookie.

135. Pittsburgh Steelers: Kevin Dotson, G, Louisianna-Lafeyette

Pauline’s Ranking: #204 (G12) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #181 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: Kevin Dotson was a reliable college guard with decent size and above-average athleticism. He was durable, tough and I could see him as a back-up at the next level.

DiCecco: Dotson, a first-team All-American for the Ragin Cajuns, was a Shrine Bowl standout, but a notable omission from the NFL Scouting Combine. One of my highest-rated guard prospects in this class, Dotson is a plug-and-play starter for Pittsburgh.

134. Atlanta Falcons: Jaylinn Hawkins, S, California

Pauline’s Ranking: #395 (S32) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: N/A | RAS: N/A

Pauline: I’ve always been a big fan of Jaylinn Hawkins and though not the athlete of his teammate Ashtyn Davis, Hawkins is a better football player. He comes with better range and ball skills but the lack of speed limits him.

DiCecco: Love the Hawkins pick by the Falcons. Hawkins served as an enforcer on the back end for the Bears, and while he doesn’t have great athleticism, he has solid ball production. He is a versatile chess piece with range, that reminds me a bit of Keanu Neal.

133. Seattle Seahawks: Colby Parkinson, TE, Stanford

Pauline’s Ranking: #141 (TE8) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #150 | RAS: 6.17

Pauline: Solid selection by the Seahawks with Colby Parkinson. He’s more of a move tight end with excellent length, which will help in the red zone. Parkinson does need to complete his game but could develop into a solid second tight end.

DiCecco: Parkinson becomes the latest Stanford tight end to grace the NFL. Parkinson is built like a power forward (6-7, 252), but should thrive as a red-zone weapon as a rookie. Still finding his way as a blocker.

132. Minnesota Vikings: Troy Dye, LB, Oregon

Pauline’s Ranking: #164 (ILB07) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #118 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Vikings continue to load up on defense adding Troy Dye. He’s an intense linebacker with great instincts. Dye has scheme limitation and must improve his play in coverage but he’s a tough run and chase linebacker who will add value on coverage units.

DiCecco: Troy Dye is built more like a safety than an NFL linebacker, but is a rangy player with an astute football IQ and plays like his hair is on fire. Vikings add some more speed to the second-level.

131. Arizona Cardinals: Rashard Lawrence, DT, LSU

Pauline’s Ranking: #125 (DT12) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #133 | RAS: 6.2

Pauline: The Cardinals get the interior defensive line help they needed in Rashard Lawrence. Not the greatest athlete or most impactful, Lawrence is incredibly quick and his intensity will be infectious.

DiCecco: Lawrence doesn’t add much in terms of pass rush, but he is a big-bodied interior player that will eat up blocks and makes plays in the running game.

130. Minnesota Vikings: James Lynch, DE, Baylor

Pauline’s Ranking: #72 (DT8) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #98 | RAS: 8.49

Pauline: The Vikings get another bargain, this time on the defensive line. In James Lynch, they get a fiery pass rusher who can play on the inside of their four-man line.

DiCecco: Minnesota adds Baylor’s James Lynch to their defensive line contingent. Lynch will need to add some size to play the interior at the next level but has a relentless motor and an aggressive mentality. A rotational player in Year 1.

129. New York Jets: Cameron Clarke, G, Charlotte

Pauline’s Ranking: #245 (G16) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #279 | RAS: 4.3

Pauline: The Jets continue to fortify the offensive line, adding Cameron Clark with their third pick in this frame. He’s a college tackle who projects to guard and though I graded him as a late-round choice, Clark is a solid developmental blocker who could start if coached properly.

DiCecco: Another Charlotte player comes off the board, as Clark now joins Alex Highsmith. Clark has a strong week at the Shrine Bowl and is an immensely underrated tackle prospect. Clark doesn’t have the desired length that teams covet for the position, but the three-year starter offers the versatility and athleticism to kick inside to guard.

128. Buffalo Bills: Gabriel Davis, WR, Central Florida

Pauline’s Ranking: #62 (WR11) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #80 | RAS: 6.88

Pauline: The Bills come away with yet another steal in this draft, selecting receiver Gabe Davis in the fourth frame. Davis has the makings of a number two WR in the NFL and is dominant in so many ways. He lacks vertical speed and has a limited route tree but comes with great upside.

DiCecco: Gabe Davis is a solid choice for Buffalo, who continues to add pieces for Josh Allen. Davis can develop into a starting-caliber receiver in time but lacks the speed to stretch the field. Good possession player to complement Diggs.

127. Philadelphia Eagles: K’Von Wallace, S, Clemson

Pauline’s Ranking: #232 (S19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #146 | RAS: 9.42

Pauline: I’m surprised the Eagles, a team who emphasizes speed, took K’Von Wallace this early. The Clemson senior is a tough, heady safety with terrific instincts. And while he does not have mental lapses on the field, his size and speed scream late rounds to me.

DiCecco: Eagles add a developmental safety to a suddenly crowded room. Wallace doesn’t offer much in terms of speed or size but is an extremely versatile back end player that plays a physical brand of football. Should be a special teams maven in the early goings.

126. Houston Texans: Charlie Heck, OT, North Carolina

Pauline’s Ranking: #175 (OT15) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #187 | RAS: 7.67

Pauline: Charlie Heck was well-liked in some areas of the scouting community as he’s a long, intelligent offensive tackle with excellent bloodlines. In the end, I think he’s a very good back-up who was selected a round too early.

DiCecco: Texans move up to select North Carolina tackle Charlie Heck, a Shrine Bowl standout whose father is a coach in the NFL. Tantalizing size (6-8, 311), Heck is surprisingly athletic despite his lumbering frame. Pass protection is his bread and butter but has the intangibles to develop in the running game.

TRADE ALERT: Texans trade up with Rams | The Houston Texans have traded up with the Los Angeles Rams

125. New York Jets: James Morgan, QB, Florida International

Pauline’s Ranking: #121 (QB7)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #122 | RAS: 3.86

Pauline: In the weeks leading up to the draft I mentioned the Jets as one of three teams hot for James Morgan. I also said Morgan would be selected before Jake Fromme. In Morgan, the Jets get a terrific young quarterback to develop behind Sam Darnold- someone who could be a spot starter or a signal-caller they can develop and trade for early picks in the future.

DiCecco: Jets take my sixth-rated quarterback prospect in the draft in FIU’s James Morgan. The Green Bay native grew up idolizing Brett Favre, and watching him play, you can see similarities in their respective games. Morgan has the fearless mentality and arm strength to make every throw and sees the field well. He has starter upside but will be a high-level back up to Sam Darnold.

124. Pittsburgh Steelers: Anthony McFarland, RB, Maryland

Pauline’s Ranking: #151 (RB12)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #145| RAS: 4.44

Pauline: The Steelers get a terrific player in Anthony McFarland. He’s a speedy game-breaker who also runs hard on the inside and will be a great complimentary back for Pittsburgh. This further proves my story from earlier this week that alleged character issues levied against McFarland were unfounded.

DiCecco: I knew the Steelers liked TCU’s Sewo Olonilua as a Day 3 running back to complement James Conner, so a bit surprised to see McFarland here. McFarland’s skill set fits the Steelers’ identity as a tough runner with decent build-up speed. His vision and anticipation is still a work in progress, but he’s a nice piece to a committee.

123. Dallas Cowboys: Reggie Robinson II, CB, Tulsa

Pauline’s Ranking: #96 (CB11)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #85 | RAS: 9.64

Pauline: I mentioned Reggie Robinson during my day two notes as there are many who feel he will end up as one of the best corners from this draft. Robinson has elite size/speed numbers and only to develop his game more. This was a terrific pick by Dallas.

DiCecco: Cowboys continue to retool their secondary, adding Tulsa’s Reggie Robinson. Robinson is a late-riser with imposing size (6-1, 205), ball production, and experience. Should factor into the secondary equation early as a rookie.

122. Indianapolis Colts: Jacob Eason, QB, Washington

Pauline’s Ranking: #57 (QB5)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #89 | RAS: 3.39

Pauline: The hits keep coming for the Colts and Chris Ballard as they hope to have their quarterback of the future in Jacob Eason. Eason needs a lot of work on his game but his a statuesque pocket passer with a rifle arm.

DiCecco: Colts potentially land Philip Rivers’ successor in Jacob Eason. Eason, who has one of the draft’s strongest arms, has prototypical size and adequate deep ball accuracy. He’ll need to improve his pocket presence and timing on intermediate throws.

121. Detroit Lions: Logan Stenberg, G, Kentucky

Pauline’s Ranking: #122 (G4)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #162 | RAS: 6.18

Pauline: Another dominant, small area blocker comes off the board as the Lions select Logan Stenberg. The UK senior is great at what he does- annihilate defenders once he gets his hands on them. You can’t use him in motion but Stenberg will help the Lions running game.

DiCecco: Lions add some nasty to the interior of their offensive line. Stenberg is one of my favorite Day 3 prospects, as I believe he has the football intelligence and nastiness to play at a high level for a long time. A feisty, blue-collar player that will be a fan favorite.

120. New York Jets: La’Mical Perine, RB, Florida

Pauline’s Ranking: #144 (RB11)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #133 | RAS: 5.3

Pauline: The Jets passed up several good receivers to chose Lamical Perine. A tough inside ball carrier who is also a terrific pass catcher out of the backfield, Perine will be a good rotational back.

DiCecco: Perine has gotten a bit overlooked throughout the draft cycle, but he fits well as a rotational runner with the Jets. Excellent as a receiving threat out of the backfield.

119. Atlanta Falcons: Mykal Walker, LB, Fresno State

Pauline’s Ranking: #140 (OLB12)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #136 | RAS: 8.16

Pauline: The Falcons get one of my personal favorite linebackers in Mykal Walker. He was a terrific pass rusher on the outside of a 3-4 in 2018 then moved to a traditional MLB spot this year and held his own. An understated prospect, the Falcons got a terrific player.

DiCecco: Mykal Walker is a player that both Tony and I have been high on throughout the process. Walker began his collegiate career at Azusa Pacific before making the switch to Fresno. Played defensive end and both linebacker spots as a senior, but the best fit will likely be at mike or will linebacker at the next level.

118. Denver Broncos: Albert Okwuegbunam, TE, Missouri

Pauline’s Ranking: #61 (TE2)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #121 | RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Broncos continue to add speed and athleticism at the skill positions with Albert Okwuegbunam. At one time considered a potential first-round pick, Okwuegbunam has the skills necessary to be a downfield threat at the tight end position. Character issues and the question is how much Albert O really loves football pushed him into day three.

DiCecco: Broncos make an interesting selection, adding Okwuegbunam to pair with last year’s first-round pick Noah Fant. Denver has done an outstanding job surrounding second-year quarterback Drew Lock with a bevy of athletic playmakers.

117. Jacksonville Jaguars: D.J. Wonnum, OLB, South Carolina

Pauline’s Ranking: #185 (OLB20) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #212| RAS: 8.04

Pauline: The Vikings wanted to add another pass rusher and they may have a good one in D.J. Wonnum. He’s an explosive defender who can come out of a three-point stance or stand over tackle. Wonnum was well-liked in scouting circles and just needs more consistency on the field.

DiCecco: Vikings add an intriguing edge rusher in South Carolina’s D.J. Wonnum. He’s demonstrated the ability to play with his hand on the ground, though his best fit is likely as a rush linebacker.

116. Jacksonville Jaguars: Ben Bartch, OT, St. John’s (Minn)

Pauline’s Ranking: #97 (OT12)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #74| RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Jaguars get one of the top small school blockers in Ben Bartch.  Dominant at St John’s, he held his own during three days of Senior Bowl practice.  Bartch comes with an upside and could develop into a starter.

DiCecco: Bartch, a Division III standout at St. John’s (Minn) was originally a tight end before making the transition to the offensive line. Bartch has plenty of athleticism and a high ceiling but is a bit of a project player.

115. Cleveland Browns: Harrison Bryant, TE, Florida Atlantic

Pauline’s Ranking: #83(TE04)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #87| RAS: 4.66

Pauline: The Browns wanted to add a tight end and they got a good one in Harrison Bryant.  Though not spectacular in any single area, he’s a consistent and reliable pass catcher with good playing speed.  More of a move tight end, Bryant must step up his blocking.

DiCecco: Harrison Bryant is a bit on an interesting selection for the Browns, given Austin Hooper’s sizeable contract. Bryant has a well-rounded skill set, though not particularly stellar in any area. He’ll have a chance to ease his way onto the field as a rookie.

114. Arizona Cardinals: Leki Fotu, DT, Utah

Pauline’s Ranking: #106 (DT11)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #113| RAS: 6.57

Pauline: As I mentioned in my column on Wednesday, Leki Fotu was one of the most frustrating players in the draft.  He has a first-round physique, flashes dominance but also disappears for stretches.  The reward out-weighed the risk in round four and if the light goes on, the Cardinals got a steal.

DiCecco: The Cardinals land the space-eating nose defensive tackle from Utah. Fotu is a massive interior defender that plays with outstanding leverage and quickness off the ball. Very disruptive in the running game and strong at the point of attack.

113. Carolina Panthers: Troy Pride, CB, Notre Dame

Pauline’s Ranking: #100 (CB13)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #86| RAS: N/A

Pauline: Troy Pride Jr. comes off a disappointing senior campaign but at the top of his game he has starting potential.  Scouts stamped him as a potential first-round pick before the season and if he gets his game back to where it was in 2018, the Panthers got a steal.

DiCecco: Troy Pride is another prospect that I had a third-round grade on. An extremely fluid defender with top-end speed and plus ball skills. His quiet senior season was overshadowed by his Senior Bowl performance, where he thrived in 1-on-1s. Carolina got excellent value with starter upside.

112. Las Angeles Chargers: John Kelly, RB, UCLA

Pauline’s Ranking: # 129 (RB08)| Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #142| RAS: 7.61

Pauline: Joshua Kelley is an underrated ball carrier, who, like his teammate Darnay Holmes, looked great at the Senior Bowl.  He’s an explosive back that will do well as a rotational ball carrier/situational runner.

DiCecco: Chargers get a steal in UCLA’s Joshua Kelley. Kelley is another player who made the most of a strong pre-draft process, shining on the grand stages of the Senior Bowl and NFL Combine. An intriguing blend of size, speed, and balance. Like the Kelley-Ekeler tandem.

111. Miami Dolphins: Solomon Kindley, G, Georiga

Pauline’s Ranking: #136(G07) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #135| RAS: 3.66

Pauline: Solomon Kindley was all over draft boards for a variety of reason.  He’s another dominant small area mauler who will help improve Miami’s run blocking.

DiCecco: The Dolphins continue to build around Tua Tagovailoa, adding Solomon Kindley to the offensive line. Kindley is a powerful interior player with the strength to anchor. His specialty is pass protection, but he plays with an edge in the running game.

110. New York Giants: Darnay Holmes, CB, UCLA

Pauline’s Ranking: #89 (CB9) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #83| RAS: 3.66

Pauline: The Giants get a steal in Darnay Holmes.  While there was some inconsistency in his film, Holmes had a great week of practice at the Senior Bowl then turned in a terrific combine workout.  He’s explosive and should quickly hold down nickel duties as a rookie.

DiCecco: Giants add Holmes, a standout slot defender, to their rebuilt secondary. Holmes is a tough, aggressive defensive back but was inconsistent for the Bruins last season. Holmes put together a strong pre-draft cycle, impressing in Mobile and the NFL Scouting Combine, and has the tools to develop into a standout nickel defender.

TRADE ALERT: Raiders trading up. 121 to 109. Gave Lions 172 also. | The Las Vegas Raiders have traded with the Detroit Lions, moving up to pick 109. The Lions will receive pick 121 and 172.

109. Las Vegas Raiders: John Simpson, OT, Clemson

Pauline’s Ranking: #253 (OT19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #157| RAS: N/A

Pauline: The Raiders get my top rated pure guard in this draft.  In Simpson they are getting a nasty, small area blocker who stands out in the running game.

DiCecco: Savvy pick for the Raiders, who now add John Simpson to their impressive offensive haul. Simpson boasts tremendous size and strength and excels in the running game, but will need some work in pass protection.

108. Washington Redskins: Saahdiq Charles, OT, LSU

Pauline’s Ranking: #253 (OT19) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #157| RAS: N/A

Pauline: Moments after unloading Trent Williams the Redskins selected the player they hope will replace him in Saahdiq Charles.  The LSU underclassman has terrific size and upside but made a big mistake entering the draft.  Had he hung around for another season Charles could’ve been a top 45 choice in 2021.

DiCecco: Washington gets their offensive tackle in LSU’s Charles. Charles has many plus athletic traits to work with, but some off-field concerns likely caused his tumble. He has immense upside but will be to mature as he continues to develop his skill set.

TRADE ALERT: Redskins move on from Williams | The Washington Redskins have traded with the San Francisco 49ers, trading away Trent Williams. The Redskins will receive a fifth-round pick this year and a third-round pick next year.

107. Cincinnati Bengals: Akeem Davis-Gaither, LB, Appalachian State

Pauline’s Ranking: #76 (OLB06) | Scouting Report
PFN Consensus: #70| RAS: N/A

Pauline: I wrote yesterday the Bengals would address the linebacker position and they got another good one in Akeem Davis-Gaither.  The speedy defender has safety like size as well as defensive back speed.  He was one of the better off the ball/space linebackers in this draft and the only reason he fell out of day three was due to post Senior Bowl foot surgery.  This was a terrific selection for the Bengals.

DiCecco: I had a third-round grade on Davis-Gaither, but his pre-draft surgery, coupled with his slight build and small school pedigree dropped him to Day 3. ADG is a rangy player with plenty of juice that is exceptional in space and possesses outstanding coverage acumen. Liked Davis-Gaither for the linebacker-deprived Philadelphia Eagles, but he should see the field early as a rookie.

2020 NFL Draft Latest News and Rumors

Is Gang Green eyeing front seven help?

The Jets are looking heavily at inside linebackers in the later rounds of the draft. They’ve shown a ton of interest in players such as Montana’s Dante Olson, Joe Bachie of Michigan State and Cal’s Evan Weaver.

The Jets have been in constant contact with Olson throughout the predraft process, and while Bachie is my personal favorite, Weaver is a player the Jets think could start for them.

I’m also told there is continued interest from the Jets in pass rusher John Daka of James Madison, and why not? He’s one of the more underrated edge rushers in this draft, and his production was off the charts. I don’t think the Jets can wait to sign him as a UDFA, so they’ll have to use a late-round pick on Daka if they want to assure his services.

Where might Alohi Gilman land?

I would expect Notre Dame safety Alohi Gilman to come off the board by the middle of round five. While Gilman did not run well at the combine (4.61 seconds), he had some of the best short shuttle (4.08 seconds) and three-cone (6.81 seconds) marks at his position in Indianapolis.

Gilman impressed scouts when he lined up at corner for two days of Senior Bowl practice, and with more and more teams lining up three safeties, it’s important to have one who makes plays when the ball is in the air.

He is receiving interest from the New England Patriots, Cleveland Browns, Dallas Cowboys and Carolina Panthers.

Small school developmental quarterback is of late-round interest

Earlier this week, we posted a scouting report on fast-rising quarterback Reid Sinnett of San Diego, a prospect who wasn’t graded by scouts before the season.

Sinnett is a classic pocket passer with terrific intelligence; he was given offers to play at Harvard and Penn before settling on San Diego. Teams have come away incredibly impressed with his interviews, and Sinnett is a potential late-round developmental pick who is getting a lot of love from Tampa Bay, Kansas City, New England and Jacksonville.

Teams could take a flier on a former Terp returning from injury

Former Maryland cornerback Tino Ellis has been receiving a lot of interest lately, as almost two dozen teams have called on him since the middle of April. Ellis came into the season with late-round grades and high hopes before he suffered a pectoral injury early in October and was lost for the season.

Over six feet tall and 200 pounds with solid ball skills, don’t be surprised if a team takes a flier on Ellis in the final rounds.