Ohio Valley Conference
2020 NFL Draft Prospects

Kentel Williams, RB, Austin Peay

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned Third Team FCS All-America honors as an all-purpose player and rushed 104 times for 831 yards and seven touchdowns as a junior in 2018. Earned First Team All-Ohio Valley Conference honors, rushed 175 times for 895 yards and 11 touchdowns and caught 36 passes for 327 yards and three TDs as a senior.

Positives: Tough ball carrier with good vision who also lines up as a return specialist. Quick, weaves through the defense and finds the open spot on the field. Works runs, finds the lanes and keeps his feet moving. Solid pass catcher who uses his frame to shield away defenders and extends to make the reception away from his body. Easily adjusts to the errant throw and looks the ball into his hands.

Negatives: Displays limited strength and gets easily brought down at the point by a single defender. One-speed back who does not show a burst.

Analysis: Williams possesses the tools necessary to make an NFL roster as a situational back and third-down ball carrier if he produces as a returner this summer.

Aaron Patrick, DE, Eastern Kentucky

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team FCS All-America honors and made 52 tackles (16.5 for loss) with 10 sacks and three forced fumbles as a senior in 2019. Earned First Team All-Ohio Valley Conference honors as a junior in 2018 and as a sophomore in 2016 and combined to make 106 tackles (22 for loss) with 14.5 sacks and two forced fumbles in those seasons. Suffered a season-ending injury in the third game of the 2017 season.

Positives: Undersized college defensive end who flashes ability as a pass rusher. Plays with terrific knee bend and pad level, quickly gets his hands up and keeps his feet moving. Strong for his size, moves well about the field and effectively fights with his hands.

Negatives: Lacks bulk and gets engulfed at the point and easily outpositioned from plays. Does not show a great first step off the snap.

Analysis: Patrick was a solid small-school defensive end, but he lacks the size and speed for the next level. He possesses growth potential that he must reach in order to have any chance to make a practice squad.

Marlon Bridges, S, Jacksonville State

Career Snapshot: Four-year starter who earned First Team All-Ohio Valley Conference honors in each of those four seasons. Made 61 tackles (five for loss) with five pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 69 tackles (2.5 for loss) with two interceptions as a junior. Made 81 tackles (six for loss) with three INTs and five PBUs as a sophomore. Made 87 tackles (four for loss) with four interceptions and six pass breakups as a redshirt freshman.

Positives: Tough run-defending safety who picks up coverage assignments well. Efficient, quickly locates the ball and takes good angles to the action. Flies around the field to make positive plays and wraps up tackling.

Negatives: Plays to his 40 time and shows marginal deep speed. Lacks great range.

Analysis: Bridges offers nice size and has a good head for the ball, but he comes with athletic limitations. He’s a strong-safety prospect who must stand out on special teams.

Josh Pearson, WR, Jacksonville State

Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who earned First Team FCS All-America honors and caught 67 passes for 1,123 yards and 17 touchdowns as a junior in 2018. Made 59 catches for 943 yards and 13 touchdowns as a senior. Was academically ineligible for most of his first two seasons.

Positives: Nice-sized receiver who is a force when focused on his game. Tracks the pass in the air, uses his hands to separate from defenders and gets vertical to come away with the difficult catch. Adjusts to the errant throw and effectively looks the ball into his hands.

Negatives: One-speed receiver who lacks burst and the ability to run away from defenders. Loses his focus and takes his eyes off the ball. Not always on the same page as his quarterback. Must pick up his intensity as a blocker. Gives halfhearted effort on the field at times.

Analysis: Pearson possesses the size and speed to play in the NFL, but he was not the dominant receiver many thought he should have been at the small-school level. He must elevate his game and consistently play at a high level, and at the very least Pearson should receive practice-squad consideration this summer.

Cam Carter, OT, Murray State

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter at left tackle.

Positives: Large offensive lineman who displays flashes of ability. Possesses terrific length and blocks with leverage. Quickly gets into blocks, stays square and gets leverage on opponents. Keeps his feet moving and keeps his head on a swivel. Makes good use of angles and body positioning to seal opponents from the play.

Negatives: Does not show great vision or awareness. Haphazard and consistently off balance. Seems unsure of himself.

Analysis: Carter showed flashes of next-level ability and has the size to play in the NFL. He needs a lot of work on his game, but Carter should get practice-squad consideration if he shows any type of motivation in camp this summer.

Zach Hall, ILB, Southeast Missouri

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team FCS All-America honors in each of his final two seasons at Southeast Missouri. Made 123 tackles (9.5 for loss) with 3.5 sacks, three forced fumbles, two interceptions and four pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 168 tackles (12 for loss) with two sacks, four interceptions, two forced fumbles and six pass breakups as a junior. Earned Second Team All-Ohio Valley Conference honors and made 79 tackles (15 for loss) with nine sacks as a sophomore.

Positives: Hard-working, instinctive linebacker who forces the action. Explosive against the run, fires up the field and flows well laterally. Instinctive, remains disciplined with assignments and shows ability in zone coverage. Easily changes direction, breaks down well and viciously attacks opponents. Plays smart, tough football and works hard to get involved in the action.

Negatives: Really best in the box or up the field. Plays to his 40 time and struggles in pursuit.

Analysis: Hall is a terrific run defender, but he comes with marginal size and speed that will limit him at the next level. His intensity is infectious, and Hall could potentially back up on the inside of a 3-4 alignment.

Jaylon Moore, WR, Tennessee Martin

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who set career highs with 52 receptions for 799 yards and eight touchdowns as a junior in 2018. Made 16 catches for 292 yards and five TDs as a senior.

Positives: Athletic receiver who flashes skill. Tracks the pass in the air, gets vertical and extends to make the reception away from his frame. Uses his length as an advantage, adjusts to the throw and makes the reception in stride. Gets up in a crowd and comes down with the difficult catch. Comes back to the ball and boxes out opponents with his body. Plays to his 40 time and shows the ability to get behind defenses.

Negatives: Doesn’t display timing on receptions and misjudges deep throws. Lets catchable long throws slip through his hands. Missed most of last season with injury. College production was never eye-popping.

Analysis: Moore possesses the size, speed and athleticism to compete at the next level and flashed that ability in college. He had some great battles against CJ Henderson of Florida last year before his season was interrupted by injury. Moore is unpolished and needs work on his game, but he should get practice-squad consideration at the very least based on his upside.

Mekhi Brown, DE, Tennessee State

Career Snapshot: Transfer from Alabama who started both his seasons at Tennessee State. Made 26 tackles (6.5 for loss) with four sacks as a junior in 2018. Made 17 tackles in five games as a senior.

Positives: Talented pass rusher whose 2019 season was cut short by injury. Occasionally stands over tackle, breaks down well and plays with terrific pad level. Fast up the field as a pass rusher, easily moves about the field and flows well laterally in pursuit of the action. Effectively uses his hands to protect himself.

Negatives: Doesn’t have a lot of impact on games and should be more productive. Really must pick up the intensity.

Analysis: Brown possesses the size and speed to be used as a one-gap end or 3-4 outside linebacker at the next level, but he rarely plays up to expectation. His development was halted by injury last season, and while he comes with upside, Brown must quickly pull the pieces together and prove he wants to make football a career.

Da’Jour Nesbeth, CB, Tennessee State

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who made 50 tackles (four for loss) with one interception and five pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 58 tackles with four INTs and seven PBUs as a junior.

Positives: Nice-sized cornerback with the physical ability and the ball skills to play at the next level. Effective facing the action, stays on the receiver’s hip out of breaks and nicely times his pass defenses. Shows the ability to track the pass in the air, gets his head back around and positions himself against opponents to defend the throw. Solid open-field tackler who willingly comes up the field and stops the run. Possesses a burst to the ball.

Negatives: Indecisive and has questionable instincts. Comes off a disappointing senior season.

Analysis: Nesbeth was a consistent starter at Tennessee State for three seasons and turned in bigtime ball production during his sophomore and junior campaigns. He possesses the size to play at the next level, but Nesbeth is a scheme-limited prospect with questionable instincts.

Chris Rowland, WR, Tennessee State

Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who earned First Team FCS All-America honors as an all-purpose player and was named Ohio Valley Conference Offensive Player of the Year as a senior in 2019, when he caught 104 passes for 1,437 yards and eight touchdowns and returned one kickoff and one punt for touchdowns. Earned Second Team All-OVC honors as a receiver and returner, made 57 catches for 727 yards and five TDs and ranked sixth in FCS with 13.0 yards per punt return as a junior.

Positives: Undersized slot receiver whose main duty at the next level will be returning punts. Quick in a small area, creative when the ball is in his hands and consistently keeps the play in bounds to pick up positive yardage. Very tough and plays bigger than his listed size.

Negatives: Small and short. Plays to one speed and has a minimal burst. Really must improve his route running.

Analysis: Rowland was incredibly productive at the small-school level, but he has limitations. He’s a slot receiver and return specialist for the next level, but he must quickly produce in camp this summer to make a practice squad.

Lachavious Simmons, G, Tennessee State

Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team All-Ohio Valley Conference honors as a senior in 2019. Saw time at both tackle positions and left guard during his career at Tennessee State.

Positives: Massive blocker who is best in a small area. Strong, squares into opponents and drives defenders off the line as a run blocker. Sets with a wide base, works to bend his knees and jolts defenders with terrific hand punch.

Negatives: Overextends into blocks and lacks balance. Not fluid on his feet and struggles to adjust.

Analysis: Simmons is a size prospect who must improve the consistency of his techniques and play. He possesses potential as a backup guard, which should help him get practice-squad consideration this fall.

View more scouting reports

Page 2: Colonial Athletic Association
Page 3: Ohio Valley Conference
Page 4: Missouri Valley Conference
Page 5: Remaining D1-FCS Teams

PFN launches 2021 Mock Draft Simulator!
Although the 2021 draft season is almost a year away, it is never too early to start building your favorite team with future draft prospects. The PFN Mock Draft Simulator has been updated to include over 350 prospects in the 2021 NFL Draft Class. Choose your speed, trade all you want (for free), and put together a winning draft class for your favorite team! Click here to enter the simulator!