Miami Dolphins 2020 Rookie Scouting Reports

In the 2020 NFL Draft, the Miami Dolphins selected 11 players, with six of them taken in the first three rounds. Here are their scouting reports.

In the 2020 NFL Draft, Miami Dolphins GM Chris Grier and Head Coach Brian Flores selected 11 players, with more than half of them (6) taken in the first three rounds. While there has been plenty of buzz around some of them – most notably potential franchise quarterback Tua Tagovailoa – do we really know what each of them brings to the table? How many of them can we realistically expect to contribute in their first season? How can we best manage expectations for the newest members of the Miami Dolphins?

To help you, we’re going to drop the scouting reports for each of the Dolphins players selected, courtesy of PFN’s Chief Draft Analyst Tony Pauline. We’re also going to include Pauline’s draft grades, ranking, and projected draft round, along with the PFN consensus ranking and the player’s Relative Athletic Score. Further, we’re going to put here what Pauline and PFN’s Senior Draft Analyst Andrew DiCecco said on draft night.

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Miami Dolphins 2020 NFL Draft: First Round Selections

On the first night of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Dolphins selected QB Tua Tagovailoa, OT Austin Jackson, and CB Noah Igbinoghene. While the Dolphins were on the clock, PFN was joined by wide receiver and he provided instant reaction to each of the Dolphins picks. We’re putting those videos in this post as well.

Round 1, No. 5 overall: Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
7th Overall | QB01 | 4.40 Grade | Projected Round: First

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
7th Overall | QB02 | RAS: Not Available

What we said on draft night
Pauline: Give the Miami Dolphins credit as they get the player they’ve coveted for two years and had everybody fooled. If Tua stays healthy, this selection would be the equal of the Dan Marino pick in 1983 – another terrific quarterback falling into their laps. There’s a lot of risk in this selection, but if it all works out Miami just selected their franchise QB for the next decade.

DiCecco: Miami nabs my top quarterback prospect in the 2020 class in Tua Tagovailoa. Despite the medical concerns, Tagovailoa possesses a sky-high ceiling and will serve as the Dolphins face of the franchise for the next decade. Miami must come out of the first round with an offensive tackle to protect their injury-riddled quarterback.

Career Snapshot
Tua Tagovailoa was a two-year starter at Alabama who earned Second Team All-America honors. As a sophomore, he led the SEC with 43 touchdown passes and completed 69 of his passes for 3,966 yards with six interceptions.

In his junior season, he suffered a major injury, dislocating his hip that ended his season. Prior to the injury, he completed 71.4% of his passes for 2,840 yards and 33 touchdowns. Most impressive? He only threw three interceptions.

When you combine both years as a starter, that’s a 76:9 touchdown/interception ratio. In addition to his accomplishments on the field, he earned Second Team All-SEC honors.

Positives
Tua is a polished quarterback with a long injury history that includes a serious hip issue from last season. He remains poised under the rush, steps up in the pocket to buy time, and naturally looks off the safety.

Tua displays complete command and control of the offense, uses all his weapons, and leads the team extremely well. He knows what’s happening on the field, quickly releases the ball, and delivers passes that immediately get to the intended target.

Tua displays timing, puts passes in front of receivers, and lets them run to the throw. He goes through progressions and takes the safe underneath outlet if nothing else is available.

He keeps his feet active, displays outstanding pocket awareness, and senses the rush. Easily moves outside the box to give himself a better view of the field and buys time for receivers. Makes good decisions and does not force the ball to covered targets. Flashes the ability to drop the ball in the bucket and nicely place passes into the receiver’s hands.

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Negatives
Durability has been a major issue throughout his college career. Stands to improve his downfield accuracy and pass placement.

Analysis
When healthy and on the field, Tagovailoa was a productive quarterback who naturally led the Alabama offense up and down the field. While he lacks pocket stature, he possesses all the other traits and qualities necessary to be a starting quarterback in the NFL.

The hip injury suffered late last season is a big question mark and will be viewed differently around the league, but from a passing and intangible point of view, Tagovailoa is the top quarterback in this year’s draft.

Round 1, No. 18 overall: Austin Jackson, OT, USC

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
22nd Overall | OT06 | 4.16 Grade | Projected Round: First

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
35th Overall | OT07 | RAS: 9.47

What we said on draft night
Pauline: I received a lot of grief for having Austin Jackson rated so highly, but the Dolphins agreed with me. Jackson was one of the best left tackle pass protectors in this draft and he comes with a huge upside. He needs to improve his consistency as well as his run blocking, but the Dolphins got a great prospect in Jackson.

DiCecco: Following the Tua selection, I mentioned it was imperative the Dolphins capitalize on a strong offensive tackle class and come away with one in the first round to protect Tagovailoa. Jackson is an immensely talented, albeit raw prospect, that is one of the more athletic tackle prospects in this class.

Career Snapshot
As a true freshman, Jackson played in all 14 games but more as a reserve lineman. He also was part of the special teams field goal unit. As a sophomore, he was named the Trojans’ starting left tackle and started in all 12 games. Heading into his junior season, he donated bone marrow to his sister. As a result, he missed part of summer practices.

With a few weeks before the season was set to begin, Jackson returned to practice and was able to get himself in playing shape to begin as USC’s starting left tackle. That season, he was named first team All-Pac-12. Jackson played in 39 of 39 games during his time at USC, with 25 of them being a starter.

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Positives
Austin Jackson is an athletic tackle who is one of the best pass protectors in this year’s draft. Quickly sets up off the snap, keeps his head on a swivel, and displays good vision. Picks up stunts and blitzes, adjusts to speed rushers, and effectively knocks them from their angles of attack with a strong hand punch.

Bends his knees, sets with a wide base and keeps his feet moving. Stays square and seals defenders from the action. Easily slides off the edge, makes outstanding use of angles, and displays terrific lateral range. Flexible, resilient, and stays with plays. Has a nasty mentality and attacks blocks.

Negatives
Must improve as a run blocker. Does not get much movement and gets held up at the point by defenders. Has a tendency to fall off blocks rather than finish them.

Analysis
Jackson was a terrific left tackle on the offensive line for the Trojans the past two seasons and displayed good athleticism during combine testing. He comes with a big upside and starting potential and should only improve as he physically matures.

Round 1, No. 30 overall: Noah Igbinoghene, CB, Auburn

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
52nd Overall | CB07 | 3.86 Grade | Projected Round: Second

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
47th Overall | CB07 | RAS: 8.05

What we said on draft night
Pauline: I mentioned all week Noah Igbinoghene was moving up draft boards, but no one expected him to end up in round one. He’s well-sized, feisty, and possesses solid ball skills. And while Igbinoghene is a solid corner, it’s surprising he was selected before Jaylon Johnson and Kristian Fulton.

DiCecco: With Kristian Fulton and Jaylon Johnson still on the board, the Dolphins make a stunning pick at 30, taking Auburn’s Noah Igbinoghene. The 5-foot-10, 198-pound cornerback is a chiseled and extremely physical defensive back. The former wide receiver is still a developing player but has the upside to become a high-level starter as a nickel defender with proper coaching.

Career Snapshot
Noah Igbinoghene is a two-year starter who made 42 tackles and broke up seven passes as a junior in 2019. Made 50 tackles with one interception and 11 pass breakups as a sophomore. Switched from wide receiver to cornerback before the 2018 season. Competed in the triple jump and the long jump for Auburn track and field in 2018.

Positives
A physical cover cornerback who also doubles as a return specialist. Quickly flips his hips to transition with opponents and loses nothing from the line of scrimmage. Effectively reads and diagnoses plays, stays with the action, and competes to break up throws.

He shows the ability to stay downfield with opponents, works to get his head around to locate the pass in the air, and has an explosive closing burst of speed to the play. Effective in zone coverage, quick up the field and gives effort against the run. Wraps up tackling and brings ball carriers down at the point of attack. Game-impacting kick returner.

Negatives
He needs to polish his overall technique. Inconsistent with his back to the ball.

Analysis
Igbinoghene was a solid cornerback for Auburn who displayed consistent progress the past two seasons. He possesses the size and speed to be a nickel corner and return kicks.

Miami Dolphins 2020 NFL Draft: Day Two Selections

On the second night of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Dolphins selected OG Robert Hunt, DT Raekwon Davis, and S Brandon Jones. Below are the scouting reports from PFN Chief Draft Analyst Tony Pauline, along with analysis from Pauline and PFN Senior Draft Analyst Andrew DiCecco as the picks were made on draft night.

Round 2, No. 39 overall: Robert Hunt, OG, Louisiana

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
81st Overall | OG02 | 3.67 Grade | Projected Round: Third

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
97th Overall | OG02 | RAS: Not Available

What we said on draft night
Pauline: With D’Andre Swift off the board, the Dolphins went for another blocker, adding Robert Hunt. A right tackle at Louisiana, most team project Hunt to guard in the NFL. He’s a stout blocker with a powerful build and position versatility.

DiCecco: The Dolphins add Ragin Cajuns tackle Robert Hunt to a retooled offensive line that includes USC’s, Austin Jackson. Hunt, 6-foot-5, 323 pounds, is a powerful mauler, but will likely kick insider to guard at the pro level.

Career Snapshot
Was redshirted his freshman season. In his first year on the field, he was named the starting left guard and started all 13 games. In his second season, he started nine games at left guard and two at left tackle. In his third season, he started all 14 games and was named second team All-Sun Belt Conference. In his senior season, he suffered a groin injury after playing in seven games. Even with limited playing time, he was still named first team All-Sun Belt.

Positives
A large, nimble offensive lineman who can play tackle or guard. Plays heads-up football, keeps his feet moving, and works his hands. Explosive at the point, stays square and attacks assignments. Blocks down on defenders and seals them from the play. He keeps his head on a swivel, effectively picks up stunts and blitzes, and fluidly pulls across the line of scrimmage to block in motion. Gets movement as a run blocker and turns defenders from the line.

Negatives
Doesn’t block with consistent leverage or pad level. Doesn’t effectively redirect to linebackers at the second level.

Analysis
Hunt was a terrific right tackle at Louisiana, and he’s a strong lineman with a next-level build. He has space restrictions, and a move into guard may be in the offing as a result. At the very least, Hunt should be an inexpensive utility blocker on a depth chart.

Round 2, No. 56 overall: Raekwon Davis, DT, Alabama

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
64th Overall | DT06 | 3.80 Grade | Projected Round: Second-Third

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
99th Overall | DT09 | RAS: 6.04

What we said on draft night
Pauline: In Raekwon Davis, the Dolphins get a potential steal on the defensive line. As a sophomore in 2017, Davis looked like a legitimate first-round pick yet his game leveled off and even regressed in some spots. He’s a massive athlete who beats opponents with power or quickness but must get back to his former level of play.

DiCecco: The Dolphins continue to build the trenches under Brian Flores, adding Raekwon Davis to play alongside Christian Wilkins. Davis has an innate burst off the line of scrimmage, and despite his length, plays with solid leverage. His play tailed off last season, but if he can return to form, the Dolphins will have two blue-chip talents along the interior.

Career Snapshot
Two-year starter who made 43 tackles (2.5 for loss) with one interception and seven pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 44 tackles (3.5 for loss) with two interceptions and 10 pass breakups as a junior.

Positives
Large, explosive defensive tackle who plays with good athleticism. Quick off the snap, resilient and shows the ability to get off blocks to make the tackle. Consistently doubled by opponents, stout at the point of attack and impossible to move from the line. Bends his knees, plays with leverage, and effectively uses his hands to protect himself. Stout run defender who flashes the ability to get outside the pocket to make plays.

Negatives
Marginal pass rusher who has limitations in anything other than a small area. Never really capitalized on a tremendous sophomore season.

Analysis
Davis is a large, strong defensive lineman who occupies blocks and makes plays against the run. He’s more of a two-down defender, but he offers scheme versatility with the ability to line up in either three or four-man fronts.

Round 3, No. 70 overall: Brandon Jones, S, Texas

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
102nd Overall | S07 | 3.59 Grade | Projected Round: Third-Fourth

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
116th Overall | S08 | RAS: Not Available

What we said on draft night
Pauline: Brandon Jones is a safety I’ve ranked highly the past three years and he takes his game to Miami. He’s a hard-hitting defensive back with solid size and better than average speed. He has potential at both free and strong safety.

DiCecco: Dolphins continue to revamp their secondary, taking Texas safety Brandon Jones a round earlier than I projected. Jones plays bigger than his size would indicate and offers deep cover skills, but likely won’t supplant Eric Rowe or Adrian Colbert in his first year.

Career Snapshot
Three-year starter who earned Second Team All-Big 12 honors and made 86 tackles (4.5 for loss) with two interceptions and four pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 70 tackles (5.5 for loss) with two INTs as a junior.

Positives
Hard-hitting safety who shows ball skills between the numbers. Strong, possesses outstanding size, and defeats blocks to get to the action. A solid run defender who is forceful up the field and plays physical football. Efficient, keeps the action in front of him and takes proper angles to the play. Explodes into ball carriers, shows himself to be a big hitter and forces turnovers. Displays solid ball skills facing the action. Very effective between the numbers.

Negatives
Displays limited quickness and plays to one speed. Lacks explosive closing burst. Occasionally late to pick up assignments, which leads to blown coverages.

Analysis
Jones has been a productive safety the past three years after he caught my eye as a sophomore at Texas. He possesses range limitations, but he’s a traditional strong safety who can also line up in a zone system.

Miami Dolphins 2020 NFL Draft: Day Three Selections

On the final day of the 2020 NFL Draft, the Dolphins selected G Solomon Kindley, DT Jason Strowbridge, EDGE Curtis Weaver, LS Blake Ferguson, and WR Malcolm Perry. Below are the scouting reports (with the exception of Ferguson) from PFN Chief Draft Analyst Tony Pauline, along with analysis from Pauline and PFN Senior Draft Analyst Andrew DiCecco as the picks were made on draft night.

Round 4, No. 111 overall: Solomon Kindley, G, Georgia

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
136th Overall | G07 | 3.49 Grade | Projected Round: 4th-5th

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
135th Overall | G05 | RAS: 3.66

What we said on draft night
Pauline: Solomon Kindley was all over the place on draft boards for a variety of reasons. He’s another dominant small area mauler who will help improve Miami’s run blocking.

DiCecco: The Dolphins continue to build around Tua Tagovailoa, adding Solomon Kindley to the offensive line. Kindley is a powerful interior player with the strength to anchor. His specialty is pass protection, but he plays with an edge in the running game.

Career Snapshot
A two-year starter at left guard. Made seven starts at right guard as a sophomore in 2017.

Positives
A powerful, wide-bodied blocker who is best in a small area. Explosive and blocks with tremendous pad level. Plays with power, shows the ability to handle big, bulky defenders and gets movement as a run blocker. Stays square, keeps his feet moving, and plays through the whistle. He keeps his head on a swivel and works well with linemates.

Negatives
Minimally effective at the second level or in motion. Struggles to slide in space.

Analysis
Kindley is a dominant run blocker who is best in a small area. He’s a solid prospect for a non-zone-blocking scheme at the next level, and if Kindley could eventually break into a starting lineup on Sundays if properly coached.

Round 5, No. 154 overall: Jason Strowbridge, DT, North Carolina

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
80th Overall | DT09 | 3.68 Grade | Projected Round: Third

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
117th Overall | DT11 | RAS: 9.48

What we said on draft night
Pauline: In Jason Strowbridge, the Dolphins are getting a day two talent who fell because of position uncertainty. Strowbridge was an insanely athletic, play-making defensive tackle at UNC who lacks size and bulk. In the end, this was a value pick that will reap dividends a year or two down the road.

DiCecco: I like Strowbridge’s length and athletic traits, but teams likely struggled to find a fit on the defensive line. The former Tarheel has impressive lateral agility and burst, but plays with inconsistent pad level and is sometimes slow to react.

Career Snapshot
Redshirted as a true freshman in 2015. Came back in 2016 and recorded 12 tackles and two sacks. Played in all 12 games with nine starts in 2017 and had 34 tackles and 5.5 tackles for a loss. Had 11 starts in 2018 and earned Honorable Mention for All-ACC with 36 tackles, 5.5 sacks and 7.5 tackles for a loss. Named to the All-ACC Third Team as a senior with 45 tackles, 6.5 tackles for a loss, three sacks and an ACC-leading three fumble recoveries.

Positives
An explosive three-technique prospect who plays with incredible athleticism. Bends his knees, plays with proper pad level, and consistently gets leverage on opponents. Fires off the snap, works his hands throughout the action and keeps his feet moving.

Quickly changes direction, nicely redirects to ball carriers and makes plays in every area of the field. Flows down the line to get outside the box and covers a lot of area. Instinctive, gives effort in all areas, and wraps up tackling.

Negatives
Has a bit of a thin build and struggles to get off blocks. Displays little power.

Analysis
Strowbridge was highly rated by NFL scouts entering the season, and he lived up to expectations during the season and went on to have a terrific week of practice at the Senior Bowl. He needs to physically mature and add a bit of strength to his frame, but at the very least Strowbridge offers possibilities as a three-technique tackle and should only improve in time.

Round 5, No. 164 overall: Curtis Weaver, EDGE, Boise State

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
54th Overall | OLB05 | 3.84 Grade | Projected Round: Second

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
76th Overall | OLB07 | RAS: 7.66

What we said on draft night
Pauline: After tumbling two to three rounds later than expected, Curtis Weaver is finally swiped off the board by the Miami Dolphins.  At the top of his game in 2018, Weaver was a dominant game-changing pass rusher but he was overweight and sluggish in 2019. If he gets back in track the Dolphins got a steal.

DiCecco: Boise State’s Curtis Weaver’s fall ends. The remarkably productive edge rusher struggled with weight issues and inconsistencies last season, likely raising some concerns. If he can regain the focus he showed earlier in his career, the Dolphins landed a gem.

Career Snapshot
Two-year starter who earned Second Team All-America honors and led the Mountain West with 18.5 tackles for loss and 13.5 sacks as a junior in 2019. Earned First Team All-Mountain West honors and made 43 tackles (15 for loss) with 9.5 sacks as a sophomore. Led the Mountain West with 11 sacks and became the first freshman in conference history to earn First Team All-Mountain West honors in 2017.

Positives
Athletic college pass rusher who can be used standing over tackle or out of a three-point stance. Plays with balance, displays good change-of-direction skills and moves well to every area of the field. Rarely off his feet, uses his hands well and easily gets out into space to make plays in coverage. Can bend off the edge and easily alter his angle of attack, nicely redirects to the ball carrier and possesses a solid closing burst. Strong and holds his ground.

Negatives
Looked overweight and sluggish last season. Easily outpositioned from the action at times.

Analysis
Weaver looked like a dominant pass rusher during his sophomore season in 2018, but he was overweight last year and did not have the same impact. At the top of his game, he will be a very good 3-4 outside linebacker who can make plays behind the line of scrimmage or drop into coverage when necessary.

Round 7, No. 246 overall: Malcolm Perry, WR, Navy

Pauline’s Draft Grade and Rankings
214th Overall | RB14 | 3.34 Grade | Projected Round: Sixth

PFN Consensus Grade and Relative Athletic Score
252nd Overall | RB19 | RAS: 1.91

What we said on draft night
Pauline: Navy quarterback Malcolm Perry gets selected in the final picks of the draft. The Dolphins list him at wide receiver, a position he handled well during Shrine Game practices. Perry is smart, incredibly quick, and versatile. I expect the Dolphins to give him a try in the slot, line him up in the backfield as a running back and let him return punts.

DiCecco: The Dolphins make an interesting selection in the waning stages of the seventh round, selecting former Navy quarterback Malcolm Perry. Perry played wide receiver and running back during Shrine week and looked fairly comfortable doing so. He showcased his elusiveness, vision, and burst in the open field. His route running looked further along than some of his counterparts, so I wouldn’t be shocked if he found a spot as a depth/gadget player.

Career Snapshot
Three-year starter who was named AAC Offensive Player of the Year and rushed 295 times for 2,017 yards and 21 touchdowns as a senior in 2019. Completed 48 of 86 passes for 1,084 yards, seven TDs and three interceptions. Split time between quarterback and slot back during his first two seasons at Navy before he took over under center full-time.

Positives
Much-celebrated collegiate quarterback who will move to either receiver or running back at the next level. Smart, incredibly quick and creative. Very competitive and displays outstanding field awareness and quickness. Possesses the agility and speed necessary to turn the corner and has a burst through the hole.

Sets up defenders and makes them miss. Dangerous open-field ball carrier. Ran terrific routes during the Shrine Bowl, displayed the ability to separate from defenders, and looked natural at receiver. Perry commanded the offense extremely well.

Negatives
Sprays passes at quarterback and displays marginal accuracy. Small and easily brought down by a single defender.

Analysis
Perry was incredibly productive for the Naval Academy as he led the offense as their starting quarterback. He has size limitations, but a creative offensive coordinator will find ways to use his talents as both a receiver and ball carrier.

Matthew Cannatahttp://www.pfn365.com
Matt Cannata is the Founder and CEO of Pro Football Network. He is also the managing editor of the Miami Dolphins Vertical on Pro Football Network. Follow him on Twitter: @CannataPFN. Be sure to also follow the PFN Dolphins account: @DolphinsPFN.

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