Oregon State 2022 NFL Draft Scouting Reports include Teagan Quitoriano and Sam Noyer

The Oregon State scouting reports highlight only offensive players, including late-round RB and QB NFL Draft prospects.

The Oregon State Beavers had a middle-of-the-pack season, finishing the year with a 7-6 record and a loss to Utah State in the Jimmy Kimmel LA Bowl. Regardless, there are a small number of offensive prospects who will be leaving Oregon State for the 2022 NFL Draft. Here are the scouting reports for the few Oregon State players who might hear their names called during the three-day event.

Oregon State 2022 NFL Draft Scouting Reports

The Oregon State scouting reports highlight only offensive players, including late-round running back and quarterback options.

B.J. Baylor, RB

Positives: Highly celebrated ball carrier with average potential. Sees the field, finds the running lanes, and effectively follows blocks. Runs with an aggressive style, keeps his feet moving, and does not go down without a fight. Runs with authority, has a burst through the hole, and turns on the speed with a single step. Strong and breaks tackles to pick up yardage off initial contact.

Negatives: Runs with an upright style and takes a lot of heavy hits. Loses momentum trying to cut back against the grain and alter the angle of runs. Rarely used as a receiver out of the backfield.

Analysis: Baylor comes off a career season carrying the ball, but he is primarily an undersized downhill runner with average speed and no capacity to create yardage. The inability to catch the ball out of the backfield will be his downfall trying to make a roster.

Sam Noyer, QB

Positives: Strong-armed quarterback who is always working to make positive plays. Patient in the pocket, keeps his eyes downfield searching for open wideouts, and buys as much time as possible. Senses the rush, steps up to avoid defenders, and only leaves the pocket if it’s absolutely necessary.

Improvises when plays break down and is relatively effective picking up yardage with his legs. Throws the ball away rather than forcing passes into coverage. Possesses a solid deep arm and drives long throws with speed. Boasts a quick release and immediately gets the ball out of his hands.

Negatives: Tends to stare down the primary target. Sprays throws and makes receivers adjust to grab errant passes.

Analysis: A two-year starter at Colorado, Noyer transferred to Oregon State this season and played in just two games before missing the rest of the year. He’s a strong-armed pocket passer with an upside, yet he’s a long way from being NFL-ready.

Teagan Quitoriano, TE

Positives: Well-rounded tight end who starts with excellent knee bend as a blocker, gets leverage on opponents, and fires off the snap. Works his hands throughout the action and gets a pad on defenders. Displays good route discipline as a pass catcher, tracks the ball in the air, and looks passes into his hands. Runs solid routes for a bigger tight end.

Negatives: Gives effort blocking but displays average strength at the point of attack. Not a true downfield threat. Has no outstanding physical trait to his game.

Analysis: Quitoriano is highly regarded in some areas of the scouting community, but he lacks next-level athleticism and blocking strength. He has enough underlying ability to develop into a third tight end on a roster.

Trevon Bradford, WR

Positives: Smaller pass catcher who is effective returning punts. Quickly gets off the line of scrimmage and immediately gets to top speed. Follows the quarterback across the field and finds the opening in the defense. Tracks the pass in the air, works to make the reception away from his frame, and keeps the play in bounds to pick up positive yardage after the catch.

Negatives: Undersized and loses out in battles. Let catchable passes slip through his hands and does not always come away with the difficult grab. Plays to one speed and lacks a deep burst.

Analysis: Bradford is a utility player with average size and speed who was used in a variety of roles at Oregon State. He’s not a dynamic skill player, but he could make a roster if he produces as a return specialist this summer.

Tony Pauline is the Chief Draft Analyst for Pro Football Network. You can read all of Tony’s work here and follow him on Twitter: @TonyPauline.

FEATURED
PFN NEWSLETTER

Every day, get free NFL updates sent straight to your inbox!