East-West Shrine Bowl Invites 2022: Accepted invitations for the college football all-star game

Accepted invites for the 2022 East-West Shrine Bowl are being announced. Keep up to date with who is going to the CFB all-star game here.

The East-West Shrine Bowl is the longest-running college football all-star game. This season marks the 97th edition of the event that has become an integral part of the pre-draft evaluation process. As part of our ongoing NFL Draft coverage, we’ll be keeping you up to date with 2022 East-West Shrine Bowl accepted invites right here.

2022 East-West Shrine Bowl Invites

You can watch the Shrine Bowl on NFL Network on Thursday, February 3, 8 PM ET.

Let’s get to the invites! This list will be updated only when the school, player, or Shrine Bowl confirms that an invite has been accepted.

QB

  • E.J. Perry, Brown
  • D’Eriq King, Miami (FL)
  • Dustin Crum, Kent State
  • Brock Purdy, Iowa State
  • Jack Coan, Notre Dame
  • Skylar Thompson, Kansas State

RB

  • Clint Ratkovich, Northern Illinois
  • Leddie Brown, West Virginia
  • Calvin Turner, Hawaii
  • Jashaun Corbin, FSU
  • Isiah Pacheco, Rutgers
  • Trestan Ebner, Baylor
  • Zander Horvath, Purdue
  • Ty Chandler, North Carolina
  • Pierre Strong Jr., South Dakota State

WR

  • Ty Fryfogle, Indiana
  • Christian Watson, North Dakota State
  • Jaivon Heiligh, Coastal Carolina
  • Davontavean Martin, Oklahoma State
  • Tyquan Thornton, Baylor
  • Josh Johnson, Tulsa
  • Samori Toure, Nebraska
  • Jerreth Sterns, Western Kentucky
  • Stanley Berryhill III, Arizona
  • Charleston Rambo, Miami (FL)
  • Tanner Conner, Idaho State
  • Emeka Emezie, NC State

TE

  • Gerrit Prince, UAB
  • Nick Muse, South Carolina
  • Lucas Krull, Pittsburgh
  • Jelani Woods, Virginia
  • Chigoziem Okonkwo, Maryland
  • Derrick Reese Jr., San Jose State
  • Teagan Quitoriano, Oregon State

OL

  • Kellen Diesch, Arizona State
  • Cordell Volson, North Dakota State
  • Ja’Tyre Carter, Southern University
  • Brock Hoffman, Virginia Tech
  • George Moore, Oregon
  • Jaylon Thomas, SMU
  • Hayden Howerton, SMU
  • Xavier Newman-Johnson, Baylor
  • Dawson Deaton, Texas Tech
  • Devin Cochran, Georgia Tech
  • Jaxson Kirkland, Washington
  • Luke Wattenberg, Washington
  • Alec Lindstrom, Boston College
  • Austin Deculus, LSU
  • Jean Delance, Florida
  • Vederian Lowe, Illinois
  • Luke Tenuta, Virginia Tech
  • Myron Cunningham, Arkansas
  • Bamidele Olaseni, Utah
  • Blaise Andries, Minnesota
  • Luke Fortner, Kentucky
  • Jack Snyder, San Jose State
  • Cade Mays, Tennessee

DL

  • Tayland Humphrey, Louisiana
  • De’Shaan Dixon, Norfolk State
  • Ryder Anderson, Indiana
  • Matthew Butler, Tennessee
  • Isaiah Thomas, Oklahoma
  • Matt Henningsen, Wisconsin
  • D.J. Davidson, Arizona State
  • David Anenih, Houston
  • Thomas Booker, Stanford
  • Nolan Cockrill, Army
  • Tyree Johnson, Texas A&M
  • Big Kat Bryant, UCF
  • Marquan McCall, Kentucky
  • Deionte Knight, Western
  • Mika Tafua, Utah
  • Eyioma Uwazurike, Iowa State
  • LaBryan Ray, Alabama
  • Myron Tagovailoa-Amosa, Notre Dame
  • Noah Ellis, Idaho
  • Otito Ogbonnia, UCLA

LB

  • Jeffrey Gunter, Coastal Carolina
  • Diego Fagot, Navy
  • Micah McFadden, Indiana
  • Zakoby McClain, Auburn
  • Ali Fayad, Western Michigan
  • Darien Butler, Arizona State
  • Baylon Spector, Clemson
  • Tre Walker, Idaho
  • Nate Landman, Colorado
  • Carson Wells, Colorado
  • James Houston, Jackson State
  • Jack Sanborn, Wisconsin
  • Nephi Sewell, Utah

DB

  • Kalon Barnes, Baylor
  • Jack Jones, Arizona State
  • Darrell Baker, Georgia Southern
  • Markquese Bell, Florida A&M
  • Decobie Durant, South Carolina State
  • Percy Butler, Louisiana
  • Dallis Flowers, Pittsburg State
  • Reed Blankenship, Middle Tennessee State
  • Montaric Brown, Arkansas
  • Nick Grant, Virginia
  • Chase Lucas, Arizona State
  • DaMarcus Fields, Texas Tech
  • Bubba Bolden, Miami (FL)
  • Jermaine Waller, Virginia Tech
  • Nolan Turner, Clemson
  • Brandon Sebastian, Boston College
  • Bryce Watts, UMass
  • Ja’Sir Taylor, Wake Forest
  • Shaun Jolly, Appalachian State
  • Damarion Williams, Houston
  • Kerby Joseph, Illinois
  • Brad Hawkins, Michigan
  • Qwynnterrio Cole, Louisville
  • Elijah Hicks, California

Special Teams

  • Tommy Heatherly, Florida International
  • Billy Taylor, Rutgers
  • Ryan Stonehouse, Colorado State
  • Parker White, South Carolina

How does the Shrine Bowl select their players?

With its inception in 1925, the East-West Shrine Bowl is the longest-running college football all-star game. It was originally set up to help benefit the patients at the Shriners Hospitals for Children and their families. When the two teams kick off on February 3, it will mark the 97th edition of the game. During that time, the event has featured 77 players that would go on to have Pro Football Hall of Fame careers. Additionally, over 200 of the East-West Shrine Bowl alumni adorn the walls of the College Football Hall of Fame.

While an invite to the East-West Shrine Bowl doesn’t guarantee a long career in the NFL, an average of over 300 players who took part in the game are on NFL rosters each season. Some notable Shrine Bowl alumni include Tom Brady, Brett Favre, and John Elway.

East-West Shrine Bowl invites go out to the best college seniors. Those players are chosen following consultation with all of the 32 NFL teams and discussion of their potential to play at the next level.

Historically, the East-West Shrine Bowl invitees were split into teams based on a geographical divide at the Mississippi River. This year, however, the two teams will be split into NFL personnel groupings. The result of this change is that players will be better able to demonstrate their potential at their future NFL position.

Oliver Hodgkinson is an NFL Draft and College Football Analyst for Pro Football Network. Check out the rest of his work here, and you can find him on Twitter: @ojhodgkinson