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    2020 NFL Draft: NCAA D2/D3 and NAIA Scouting Reports

    PFN Chief Draft Analyst Tony Pauline's scouting reports for 2020 NFL Draft prospects from Division II, Division III, and the NAIA, including OT Ben Bartch.

    NCAA Division II, Division III, and NAIA Scouting Reports
    2020 NFL Draft

    Below are links to the scouting reports for 2020 NFL Draft prospects from the NCAA Division II and Division III conferences as well as the NAIA, written by Tony Pauline (Twitter: @TonyPauline), Pro Football Network’s Chief NFL Draft Analyst and Insider. To view overall and positional rankings, visit and bookmark Pauline’s Draft Board. Please note that the links below will open in a new tab.

    NCAA Division II
    2020 NFL Draft Prospects

    Auzoyah Alufohai, DT, West Georgia

    Career Snapshot: Transfer from Kennesaw State who started his lone season at West Georgia. Earned First Team All-Gulf South Conference honors and made 31 tackles (four for loss) with two sacks and three forced fumbles as a senior in 2019. Started one season at Kennesaw State and made 31 tackles (1.5 for loss) as a junior in 2017. Missed the 2018 season with a lower-body injury.

    Positives: Large, powerful defensive tackle who is best as a gap occupier. Displays terrific leg drive, easily holds his ground against double teams and occasional triple teams and bull rushes opponents off the line to collapse the pocket. Consistently defeats opponents with his power and size advantage. Takes up a lot of space in the middle of the line and can be a one-man wrecking crew. Flashed dominance during Shrine Game practices.

    Negatives: Must develop more moves with his hands and learn to do more than just duck his head and bull rush up the field. Small-area lineman who doesn’t cover a lot of area or show the ability to make plays in pursuit outside the box. Lacks an explosive first step off the snap and does not consistently play with leverage.

    Career Snapshot: Alufohai is a big, powerful lineman who dominated opponents at the small-school level. He’s a zero-technique or nose-tackle prospect, but he must consistently play with proper leverage and develop more moves to get off blocks so he can make plays on the ball. At the very least, Alufohai is a developmental prospect who should be stashed on the practice squad this season.

    Aharon Barnes, CB, Northwestern Oklahoma

    Career Snapshot: Four-year starter who earned First Team All-Great American Conference honors as a senior and as a sophomore. Made 44 tackles in 2019 and made 55 tackles (3.5 for loss) with three interceptions and 10 pass breakups in 2017. Named Honorable Mention All-GAC and made 34 tackles with two INTs and nine PBUs as a junior.

    Positives: Athletic prospect who stands out as a cornerback and special-teams player. Instinctive, quickly makes his way up the field and gives effort against the run. Displays a tremendous burst to the ball out of his plant. Game-impacting kick returner who has blocked field goals in the past.

    Negatives: Lacks a quick, fluid backpedal. Prefers to side shuffle in reverse. Easily blocked from the action and isn’t a strong tackler.

    Analysis: Barnes is an explosive athlete with good versatility, but he has size limitations. He’s primarily a special-teams prospect who can also be used backed off the line of scrimmage as a dime back.

    Jack Batho, OT, South Dakota School of Mines

    Career Snapshot: Offensive lineman who also competed in the shot put for South Dakota School of Mines track and field.

    Positives: Massive small-school lineman who looks like a man amongst boys, quickly gets his hands up and works to stays square. Strong, gets movement as a run blocker and easily turns defenders from the action. Keeps his head on a swivel and works well with linemates.

    Negatives: Lined up at left tackle in college but projects to the right side. Does not bend his knees or block with leverage. Really doesn’t show a nasty attitude.

    Analysis: Batho is a size prospect who must improve his fundamentals and pick up the intensity to have any chance to stick on a practice squad next fall.

    Dominic Cizauskas, ILB, Glennville

    Career Snapshot: Junior-college transfer who started both his seasons at Glenville State. Earned First Team All-Mountain East Conference honors and made 120 tackles (14 for loss) with four sacks, four interceptions, two forced fumbles and 10 pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 134 tackles (10.5 for loss) with three sacks, four forced fumbles, one interception and seven pass breakups as a junior. Spent 12 months in jail after he was convicted of sexual assault during on a December 2013 recruiting trip to Wisconsin, where he later committed but never played.

    Positives: Tough, run-defending linebacker with solid measurables for the next level. Breaks down well, remains disciplined with assignments and quickly reads and diagnoses the action. Immediately locates the ball, fires up the field to defend the run and breaks down well. Effectively quarterbacks the defense and makes the calls.

    Negatives: Doesn’t show great range on the field. Lacks top pursuit speed. Doesn’t get much depth on his pass drops. Consistently gets caught up in the trash.

    Analysis: Cizauskas possesses the size and speed to play middle linebacker at the next level, but he doesn’t transfer those computer numbers onto the field. He’s a solid small-school linebacker who must complete his game to have any chance at the next level.

    Dom Davis, DT, North Carolina Pembroke

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who made 41 tackles (six for loss) with three sacks as a senior in 2019. Made 55 tackles (6.5 for loss) with two sacks as a junior in 2018.

    Positives: Explosive, wide-bodied defensive lineman who shows ability as a three-technique tackle. Fires off the snap, effectively plays with proper pad level and shows power in his lower body. Strong, bull rushes opponents off the line and holds his ground against double-team blocks. Easily changes direction, redirects to the play and gives effort. Moves well laterally and quickly closes to the action.

    Negatives: Occasionally gets tall, which negates his power advantage. Very inconsistent in his all-around game.

    Analysis: Davis possesses the size, underlying athleticism and power to play at the next level, but he needs to elevate every area of his game and consistently play with proper fundamentals.

    Drew Dickinson, OG, Findlay

    Career Snapshot: Four-year starter who earned Second Team All-Great Midwest Athletic Conference honors in each of his final three seasons at Findlay.

    Positives: Explosive small-school lineman who plays with a nasty attitude. Blocks with proper lean, stays square and controls defenders at the point of attack. Sets with a wide base, bends his knees and generally blocks with leverage. Explosive and works to finish blocks.

    Negatives: Lacks agility and balance. Not mobile or athletic.

    Analysis: Dickinson is a nice-sized blocker, but he’s an average athlete with scheme limitations. He could back up at the next level at guard or potentially center.

    Kyle Dugger, S, Lenoir-Rhyne

    Career Snapshots: Four-year starter who earned the Cliff Harris Award as the best defender in Division II, made 31 tackles with two interceptions and four pass breakups and returned two punts for touchdowns in seven games as a senior in 2019.

    Earned First Team All-South Atlantic Conference honors as a defensive back and return specialist, made 76 tackles with three interceptions and two forced fumbles and posted 534 punt return yards and two TDs as a junior. Named Second Team All-SAC and made 87 tackles as a sophomore. Missed time with a hand injury in 2019.

    Positives: Athletic defensive back with the size, speed and football skill to start at the next level. Vicious open-field tackler who plays with a nasty attitude and attacks opposing ball carriers. Explosive, possesses a closing burst of speed and fights to make plays. Remains disciplined with assignments, plays heads-up football and shows good hands for the interception.

    Displayed outstanding ball skills at the Senior Bowl in one-on-one drills. Physical with receivers, keeps the action in front of him and tracks the pass in the air. Has a nice burst to the ball out of his plant. Possesses good hands for the interception. Game-impacting punt returner who is also effective on coverage units, shows the ability to make plays and forces fumbles.

    Negatives: Must improve his backpedal. Better up the field than in reverse.

    Analysis: Dugger was graded as a Day 3 pick entering the season, but he really showed well when he was on the field last season. He also looked sensational during Senior Bowl practices and combine workouts. Dugger possesses the size and versatility to line up in several different schemes and has the makings of a starting safety in the NFL.

    Austin Edwards, DE, Ferris State

    Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who earned First Team D-II All-America honors and made 64 tackles (17.5 for loss) with 10.5 sacks as a senior in 2019. Earned First Team All-Great Lakes Intercollegiate Athletic Conference honors and made 97 tackles (14 for loss) with 8.5 sacks as a junior.

    Positives: Explosive small-school defensive lineman who flashes next-level ability. Rarely off his feet, plays with proper lean and fires off the snap. Immediately gets his hands up, plays hard and keeps coming. Resilient, displays good change-of-direction skills and quickly gets into space in pursuit. Bends his knees, gets leverage on opponents and stays with his assignments. Moves well laterally down the line of scrimmage.

    Negatives: Displays average speed off the edge. Controlled at the point by blocks and doesn’t play like a 270-pound lineman at the small-school level.

    Analysis: Edwards is a relatively athletic prospect who showed flashes of brilliance at Ferris State as well as during Shrine Game practices. He comes with decent upside and could develop into a backup defensive end in a four-man line.

    Jalon Edwards-Cooper, CB, Texas A&M Commerce

    Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who made 68 tackles (six for loss) with two sacks, three interceptions and 10 pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 45 tackles (eight for loss) with three sacks, two forced fumbles, one interception and 10 pass breakups as a junior.

    Positives: Explosive cornerback who could line up at a variety of spots in the secondary. Has a physical nature to his game, works well with safeties and battles to defend the throw. Keeps the action in front of him, effectively gets position on opponents and displays a good move to the ball. Strong wrap-up tackler who gives effort against the run. Solid special-teams player.

    Negatives: Possesses poor speed and an average closing burst. Better facing the action and struggles to make plays with his back to the ball.

    Analysis: Edwards-Cooper possesses the size and skill to line up in dime packages and play special teams. Speed is an issue, which means Edwards-Cooper would be best in a zone system.

    Sterling Hammond, S, Virginia Union

    Career Snapshot: Made 72 tackles (7.5 for loss) with one sack, two interceptions, two forced fumbles and two pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Made 55 tackles (4.5 for loss) with four interceptions and four pass breakups as a junior in 2018.

    Positives: Nice-sized safety who displays ball skills and toughness against the run. Hard hitter who shows good awareness, has a quick closing burst and drives his shoulders into ball carriers. Keeps the action in front of him, remains disciplined with assignments and possesses good hands for the interception. Solid open-field tackler.

    Negatives: Lacks speed and range for free safety. Stiff. Not smooth or quick when he flips his hips in transition.

    Analysis: Hammond possesses terrific size and could make an NFL roster as a dime safety if he plays well on special teams.

    Kyle Hinton, G, Washburn

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team All-MIAA honors in each of his final two seasons at Washburn. Earned Third Team-MIAA honors as a sophomore in 2017.

    Positives: Incredibly athletic small-school left tackle who projects to guard at the next level. Sets with a wide base, bends his knees and quickly gets his hands into defenders. Fires out to the second level, shows the ability to redirect and adjust to linebackers and blocks with a nasty attitude. Stays square, outpositions opponents from the action and plays through the whistle. Fundamentally sound, keeps his feet moving and slides out in pass protection. Works his hands and always looks for someone to hit.

    Negatives: Really not a mauler. Doesn’t display much power. Must block opponents rather than catch them and lean on them.

    Analysis: Hinton was a terrific small-school offensive lineman who went on to perform brilliantly during his pro-day workout in early March. He’s a zone-blocking prospect with high upside, and he’s a solid developmental prospect who could be a starter in the NFL a season or two down the road.

    Brandon Kemp, OT, Valdosta State

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned Second Team All-Gulf South Conference honors as a junior in 2018. Earned First Team All-GSC honors as a redshirt freshman in 2016.

    Positives: Massive small-school lineman who is a size prospect. Sets with a wide base, works to bend his knees and rides defenders from their angles of attack. Keeps his head on a swivel, makes good use of angles and consistently stays square. Shows ability as a position blocker.

    Negatives: Stiff and bends at the waist. Must improve his ability in pass protection and gets walked back into the pocket.

    Analysis: Kemp is a right-tackle prospect for the next level with tremendous size, but he’s a small-school lineman who must really improve all areas of his game.

    Cameron Mayberry, RB, Colorado School of Mines

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned Second Team D-II All-America honors, rushed 271 times for 1,615 yards and 23 touchdowns and caught 26 passes for 342 yards and one score as a junior in 2018. Earned First Team D-II All-America honors and carried 229 times for 1,563 yards and 18 TDs as a sophomore. Rushed 121 times for 691 yards and eight touchdowns in seven games as a senior and missed almost half the season due to an ankle injury.

    Positives: Nice-sized ball carrier with a solid game. Patient, displays vision and quickly cuts back in a small area. Effectively follows blocks, fights for every yard possible and does the little things well. Quickly gets into the flat to make himself an available target for the quarterback. Solid blocker who picks up assignments and squares into opponents.

    Negatives: Not creative and doesn’t bounce around piles. Plays to one speed and cannot turn the perimeter.

    Analysis: Mayberry is a consistent running back who is effective as a ball carrier, as a pass catcher out of the backfield, and as a blocker. He lacks great upside, but he could find a spot on a roster as a fifth running back.

    Daniel McCants, RB, Tarleton State

    Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who earned First Team D-II All-America honors and rushed 164 times for 1,457 yards and 15 touchdowns as a senior in 2019. Earned Second Team All-Lone Star Conference honors as a running back and kick returner, carried 157 times for 1,141 yards and eight TDs and averaged 29.2 yards per kick return with one touchdown as a junior. Earned Second Team All-LSC honors as a returner and averaged 26.8 yards per kick return with two return TDs as a sophomore.

    Positives: Smallish back with the ability to create yardage. Patient, waits for blocks to develop and finds the running lanes. Easily changes direction, immediately alters the course of runs and doesn’t lose momentum. Quickly cuts back against the grain, plays faster than his 40 time and possesses the agility necessary to turn the corner. Shows a burst through the hole and uses blocks everywhere on the field.

    Negatives: Lacks size and needs space to work. Easily brought down at the point by a single defender. Not much of a pass catcher out of the backfield.

    Analysis: McCants was incredibly productive at the small-school level and is a situational back who creates his own yardage. His pass-catching ability this summer will dictate whether he makes it out of camp.

    Lamont McPhatter, S, California Pennsylvania

    Career Snapshot: Transfer from Ball State who started all three of his seasons at Cal-Penn. Earned First Team D-II All-America honors and made 58 tackles (3.5 for loss) with two interceptions and five pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Named Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference Defensive Player of the Year and made 63 tackles (3.5 for loss) with 3.5 sacks, five interceptions, two forced fumbles and four pass breakups as a junior. Earned First Team All-PSAC honors and made 76 tackles (6.5 for loss) with five INTs, three forced fumbles and 10 PBUs as a sophomore.

    Positives: Explosive, hard-hitting safety who gets the most from his ability. Remains disciplined with assignments, quickly reads and diagnoses the action and chases hard to make plays. Competes to break up throws, physically beats down opponents and shows terrific hands for the interception.

    Immediately picks up coverage assignments over the middle of the field and possesses solid ball skills. Efficient, takes good angles to the action and displays anticipation. Dynamic hitter who works to finish off opponents.

    Negatives: Does not display a great closing burst or long speed. Struggles to get through blocks and needs a clear shot at the ball carrier. Comes with average size and speed for the next level.

    Analysis: McPhatter was very productive at the small-school level, but he lacks the computer numbers for Sunday football. He’s a traditional strong-safety prospect who comes with a special-teams mentality.

    Nick Pridgeon, ILB, Winona State

    Career Snapshot: Two-year starter who earned First Team All-NSIC North honors and made 71 tackles (12 for loss) with 1.5 sacks, two interceptions and two forced fumbles as a senior in 2019. Made 57 tackles (eight for loss) with 3.5 sacks, four interceptions and three pass breakups as a junior in 2017. Played two games in 2018 before he suffered a season-ending injury.

    Positives: Underrated linebacker with terrific size and speed. Plays heads-up football, breaks down well and effectively uses his hands. Defeats blocks to get up the field and makes the tackle in space. Explosive hitter who is instinctive and effectively diagnoses the action. Stays with coverage assignments and shows terrific hands for the interception. Plays to his 40 time.

    Negatives: Shelved with injury in 2018, which must be inspected. Stiff.

    Analysis: Pridgeon is an underrated three-down linebacker who can be used in a variety of schemes. He’s been very productive when healthy and on the field, and he could be a surprise free-agent signing next season.

    Roland Rivers, QB, Slippery Rock

    Career Snapshot: Transfer from Valdosta State who started both his seasons at Slippery Rock. Earned First Team D-II All-America honors and completed 66.9 percent of his passes for 4,460 yards and 52 touchdowns with seven interceptions as a senior in 2019. Earned First Team All-Pennsylvania State Athletic Conference honors and completed 58 percent of his passes for 2,721 yards and 28 touchdowns with 12 interceptions as a junior.

    Positives: Super-productive, small-school quarterback with next-level physical skills. Patient in the pocket, has an NFL arm and easily airs out deep throws. Puts the long ball in front of receivers and lets them run to the pass and drives the ball with speed.

    Relatively accurate, knows where his receivers are on the field and consistently identifies the open wideout. Spreads the ball around, uses all his targets and challenges the vertical game. Remains poised under the rush and keeps his eyes downfield, even outside the pocket. Shows some elusiveness and creativity as a ball carrier.

    Negatives: Lack speed and doesn’t pick up big chunks of yardage as a runner. Stares down the primary target. Goes through progressions very slowly. Puts the ball up for grabs on occasion.

    Analysis: Rivers comes off a tremendous senior campaign and possesses the size and arm strength to play at the next level, but he needs a lot of work on the details of the quarterback position. He possesses upside and should get practice-squad consideration this fall.

    Prince Robinson, CB, Tarleton State

    Career Snapshot: Junior-college transfer who started both his seasons at Tarleton State. Earned First Team D-II All-America honors and made 57 tackles with four interceptions and 13 pass breakups as a senior in 2019. Earned First Team All-Lone Star Conference honors and made 61 tackles (five for loss) with five interceptions, two forced fumbles and 15 pass breakups as a junior.

    Positives: Solid small-school cornerback with next-level ball skills. Tough and physical, mixes it up with receivers and effectively times pass defenses. Plays with balance and body control, tracks the pass in the air and possesses a terrific closing burst. Quick to read and diagnose the action and plays with suddenness and explosion. Works hard to strip the ball from opponents and possesses good hands for the interception. Impacts the game as a kick returner.

    Negatives: Side shuffles when he should backpedal. Struggles to stay on the receiver’s hip out of breaks.

    Analysis: Robinson is a nice-sized corner with next-level speed and enough ball skills to get consideration in a zone system or backed off the line of scrimmage. His ability to return punts and kicks is added value.

    John Hurst, WR, West Georgia

    Career Snapshot: First-year starter who earned First Team All-Gulf South Conference honors and caught 40 passes for 654 yards and seven touchdowns as a senior in 2019.

    Positives: Big-play, small-school receiver who comes off a tremendous senior campaign. Very athletic, he possesses outstanding size and speed and shows terrific concentration. Displays a burst, gets vertical over defenders and consistently comes away with the contested grab. Plays with balance and body control.

    Negatives: Unnecessarily lets the pass get inside him. Average run-after-catch ability. Not creative when the ball is in his hands. Must improve as a blocker.

    Analysis: Hurst is a terrific athlete who displayed himself as a big-play receiver at West Georgia and has upside. He must elevate every aspect of his game and learn to do the little things well at the receiver position to make an NFL roster.

    Korie Rogers, ILB, West Georgia

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who made 63 tackles (eight for loss) with one sack and one interception as a senior in 2019. Made 68 tackles (five for loss) with two sacks and one interception as a junior. Posted 75 tackles (four for loss), three INTs and three PBUs as a sophomore. Started his college career at Clemson and transferred to Kennesaw State before he ended up at West Georgia.

    Positives: Nice-sized, run-stuffing linebacker with limited upside. Breaks down well, stays with coverage assignments and remains disciplined. Solid open-field tackler who chases the action hard.

    Negatives: Seems unsure of himself and often slow to locate the ball. Marginally quick and doesn’t show a burst of speed.

    Analysis: Rogers is a forceful linebacker who is best up the field, but he has athletic, speed and scheme limitations.

    Ter’Shawn Wharton, DE, Missouri S&T

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team All-Great Lakes Valley Conference honors as a junior in 2018 and as a sophomore in 2017. Named Honorable Mention All-GLVC and made 59 tackles (11.5 for loss) with 7.5 sacks as a senior in 2019. Made 46 tackles (13.5 for loss) with 7.5 sacks and four forced fumbles as a junior. Posted 64 tackles (21 for loss), 13.5 sacks and four forced fumbles as a sophomore.

    Positives: Explosive small-school defensive lineman who is agile and resilient and plays with proper pad level. Flashes athleticism, fluidly chases the play laterally and gets depth on pass drops when used in coverage. Keeps his feet moving, works his hands and plays with terrific leverage. Fluid when asked to twist or stunt and shows good agility.

    Negatives: Small and gets easily outpositioned from the action by a single blocker. Does not display great edge speed.

    Analysis: Wharton was an explosive small-school defender who showed flashes of ability during Shrine Game practices. He comes with size and speed limitations and may not have a true position at the next level.

    NCAA Division III
    2020 NFL Draft Prospects

    Ben Bartch, OT, St. John’s (Minnesota)

    Career Snapshot: Two-year starter at left tackle who began his college career as a tight end. Earned the Mike Stam Award as the top offensive lineman in the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference as a senior in 2019. Earned Second Team All-MIAC honors as a junior.

    Positives: Talented small-school offensive lineman with the size and skill to start in the NFL. Sets with a wide base, bends his knees and stays square. Blocks with a nasty attitude and works to finish off opponents. Strong, turns opposing defensive linemen from the play and works to bury them. Quickly gets his hands into opponents, displays exceptional hand technique and keeps his feet moving. Patient and does not overextend into blocks. Played well during Senior Bowl week.

    Negatives: Lacks range and footwork. Not very fluid. Must improve his balance.

    Analysis: Bartch was a consistent force on the St. John’s offensive line and possesses the skills necessary to eventually develop into a starter on Sundays. He’s likely better at right tackle and may even get consideration at guard, but Bartch will have a long career at the next level with proper coaching.

    Jackson Erdmann, QB, St. John’s (Minnesota)

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team All-Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference honors in each of those seasons. Completed 64 percent of his passes for 5,040 yards and 47 touchdowns with 10 interceptions as a senior in 2019. Earned MIAC Player of the Year honors and completed 65.1 percent of his passes for 3,450 yards and 47 touchdowns with eight INTs as a junior.

    Positives: Nice-sized pocket passer who effectively commands and controls the offense. Patient, buys time for receivers and looks off the primary target. Goes through progressions, hits the checkdown receiver when nothing else is available and consistently locates the open wideout. Knows where receivers are on the field and puts touch on throws when necessary. Gets outside the pocket and keeps his eyes downfield to look for the open wideout.

    Negatives: Must put passes in front of receivers better and constantly makes targets adjust backwards to make the catch. Really cannot drive deep passes. Makes receivers wait on the ball.

    Analysis: Erdmann was a terrific game manager at the small-school level, but he lacks the deep arm and accuracy to make a roster in the NFL. He’s a developmental prospect whose understanding of the game could help him find a spot somewhere in the league.

    Mason Kinsey, WR, Berry College

    Positives: Productive small-school wideout who projects as a slot receiver and punt returner at the next level. Fires off the snap, quickly gets to top speed and runs sharp, crisp routes. Fires into breaks, stays low on exit and consistently positions himself to make the reception. Extends his hands to offer the quarterback a target, looks the ball into his hands and snatches the pass away from his frame. Nicely makes the reception on crossing patterns, easily adjusts to the errant throw and displays outstanding focus and concentration. Competes and works hard to come away with the catch.

    Negatives: Short and has limited size. More of a one-speed wideout who lacks the deep burst.

    Analysis: Kinsey was very productive for Berry College and went on to have a sensational week of practice at the Shrine Bowl. Opposing cornerbacks were unable to cover him, as his quickness and route-running ability made it easy for him to separate from defenders. He possesses size and speed limitations, but Kinsey will have every opportunity to make a roster as a fifth receiver and return specialist.

    Jacob Maher, TE, Framingham State

    Career Snapshot: Transfer from Worcester State who caught 56 passes for 819 yards and eight touchdowns as a senior in 2019. Two-year starter at Worcester State who made 56 catches for 986 yards and 14 touchdowns as a sophomore.

    Positives: Natural pass-catching tight end who looks more like a possession receiver on the field. Shows excellent awareness, sells routes and possesses hand-eye coordination. Nicely adjusts to the errant throw and makes the reception in stride. Extends his hands to catch the pass away from his frame and uses the sidelines effectively. Gets vertical and competes to make the reception. Consistently comes away with the tough grab with defenders draped on him.

    Negatives: Lacks a quick release off the line of scrimmage. Does not play as athletically as his computer numbers would lend one to believe.

    Analysis: Maher was a terrific small-school tight end, but he’s a bit of tweener with receiver size and average tight end speed.

    NAIA
    2020 NFL Draft Prospects

    Craig Evans, DT, Langston

    Career Snapshot: Junior-college transfer who was named Sooner Athletic Conference Defensive Player of the Year and made 29 tackles (11 for loss) with 7.5 sacks as a senior in 2019. Started his college career at Michigan State and left the Spartans program in 2016 due to personal reasons. Later revealed to have failed a drug test for marijuana and received a six-game suspension. Transferred to Arizona Western and made 58 tackles with 5.5 sacks as a sophomore in 2016. Signed with Oregon State in December 2016 but never played for the Beavers.

    Positives: Wide-bodied defensive lineman who shows the ability to make plays on the ball. Starts with terrific knee bend and leverage, fires off the snap with an outstanding first step and fights with his hands. Holds his ground against blocks and is impossible to move off the point. Keeps his feet moving, looks like a runaway locomotive at times and gives effort.

    Negatives: More of a straight-line, small-area lineman. Struggles to change direction or redirect to the play. Must develop more moves to get off blocks.

    Analysis: Evans possesses the size and quickness to line up as a zero-technique or nose tackle, but he must really develop a complete game. His size and explosion make him worth a practice-squad stash for future development.

    Jordan Suell, WR, Southern Oregon

    Career Snapshot: Three-year starter who earned First Team All-Frontier Conference honors and made 42 catches for 834 yards and 12 touchdowns as a senior in 2019. Made 41 receptions for 863 yards and nine TDs as a sophomore in 2017. Missed the first six games of the 2018 season due to injury.

    Positives: Tall, game-controlling receiver with a nose for the end zone. Possesses outstanding length, sells routes and comes back to the ball out of breaks. Extends his hands to make the reception away from his frame and shows good hand-eye coordination. Snatches the ball out of the air with his hands. Adjusts to the errant throw, makes the reception on crossing patterns and nicely comes away with the catch in stride.

    Negatives: Shows limited quickness and speed. Must pick up the intensity as a blocker. Unnecessarily lets the pass get inside him at times.

    Analysis: Suell was a dominant small-school receiver and a great red-zone target at Southern Oregon. He possesses the dimensions and underlying ability to make a practice squad, but Suell must improve the fundamentals of his game to ever have a chance to make an NFL roster.

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