2020 NFL Draft: Tampa Bay Buccaneers 7-Round Mock Draft

The Tampa Bay Bucs made the biggest splash of the offseason by signing Tom Brady, signaling they are in "win now" mode for the next couple of years. This updated Buccaneers 7-round mock draft would help to add to Brady's supporting cast and push Tampa towards the top of the standings.

Round 4, Pick 114: Hakeem Adeniji, OL, Kansas

This Buccaneers 7-round mock draft selection provides Tampa Bay with some much-needed depth and flexibility on the offensive line, and there’s also a chance that Kansas’ Hakeem Adeniji could factor into the team’s starting situation at some point down the line.

Adeniji possesses some similarities to Niang, the team’s previous pick. He has similarly imposing length, standing at almost 6-foot-5, with a wingspan over 80 inches. Adeniji also has fairly proficient mobility, and while he can be a bit choppy working the edges, he gets around well enough.

The big selling point with Adeniji, on top of his good combination of size and mobility, is his experience and intelligence. Adeniji was the Jayhawks’ starting left tackle for four full seasons, from 2016 to 2019, although he moved around the line on occasion. On tape, Adeniji shows brilliant, precise hand placement at times, which he uses to compensate for relatively lacking strength and power.

Adeniji will need to add more power to his game at the NFL level, and his lacking frame thickness has some thinking he’ll transition to guard in the NFL, a position he played at the Senior Bowl. Whatever the case, Adeniji has utility for the Buccaneers, who need depth at both tackle and guard. He has the experience at tackle, and a promising profile at guard, giving him the potential to be a versatile depth piece at a crucial position.

Round 4, Pick 139: Raequan Williams, DL, Michigan State

The Buccaneers got a high-upside edge rusher with versatility in the first round of this 7-round mock draft, but they still need to address the interior defensive line. At this point, the best one can hope for is a lineman with some athletic traits and developmental potential, and that’s what Michigan State’s Raequan Williams brings to the table.

Williams is a considerable work in progress, as he plays too tall too often, and limits his leverage by keeping his pad level too high. He’s also a bit thin-limbed at 6-foot-4, 304, contributing to inconsistencies with power and push. That said, Williams has very good length for the position, and his get-off at the snap is impressively quick. If he can lower his pad level, and attack the midsection more with his initial punches, he can start up the ladder to NFL contribution. For the Buccaneers, he’s depth at the very least, with rotational starting potential.

Round 5, Pick 161: Cole McDonald, QB, Hawaii

It was mentioned earlier that the Buccaneers have expressed interest in Washington Huskies quarterback Jacob Eason this offseason. Eason wasn’t available for the second-round pick in this Buccaneers 7-round mock draft. At that juncture, Jake Fromm was the only potential starter available, and that felt like a reach.

So here we are. It’s Round 5, and the Buccaneers, who have presumably signed Philip Rivers as a bridge quarterback in free agency, need a developmental signal-caller to sit behind him. At this stage, Hawaii’s Cole McDonald fits that profile about as well as anyone else.

McDonald is a volatile player, at a position where volatility isn’t exactly valued (See: Jameis Winston). But in McDonald’s volatility, there is an undeniable upside. He possesses good mobility, enticing arm talent, and a fearless gunslinger’s mentality. He has the strength to put velocity on his passes with ease, and he has the elasticity to fit the ball into some tight windows from different platforms.

When McDonald is in rhythm, he can make some of the prettiest throws from this class. His deep passing is especially impressive in this sense. But in McDonald’s mental game, there exists room for significant refinement, as his trigger is often late, and he has frequent lapses in decision making, due to an over-reliance on his arm (although this got better as the 2019 season went along). Sitting at least a year behind a mentor presence like Rivers could do wonders for McDonald’s development if he can handle the pace of the NFL.

Round 6, Pick 194: Amik Robertson, CB, Louisiana Tech

Do you like production? Well, you’ll like Amik Robertson then. Robertson was the NCAA’s pass deflection leader in 2019 with 16, and throughout his career with Louisiana Tech, he logged 14 interceptions and 34 deflections.

Robertson’s size (5-foot-9, 185 pounds) and his general level of competition might push him back on Day 3. Still, he projects well as a slot cornerback at the next level, with the proportionate length, physicality, and ball skills to be a force in the right role. He compliments the Buccaneers’ young cast of cornerbacks well, and he could see rotational action in his first year.

Buccaneers 7-round mock draft recap

That’s a wrap! Let’s take a look at how we were able to address the Buccaneers’ needs in this mock:

Primary Needs

  • EDGE: Drafted LSU edge defender K’Lavon Chaisson in Round 1
  • DL: Drafted Michigan State defensive lineman Raequan Williams in Round 4
  • OL: Drafted TCU tackle Lucas Niang in Round 3 and Kansas’ Hakeem Adeniji in Round 4
  • QB: Drafted Hawaii developmental quarterback Cole McDonald in Round 5

Secondary Needs

  • RB: Drafted Wisconsin running back Jonathan Taylor in Round 2
  • CB: Drafted Louisiana Tech cornerback Amik Robertson in Round 6

The Buccaneers only had seven total selections, so some secondary needs, such as safety, linebacker, and wide receiver, inevitably had to be passed on for the time being. One also would like to have more clarity at quarterback after this point, but if the Buccaneers do sign Philip Rivers, as some believe they will, then McDonald is an excellent choice to sit behind him.

What do you think about this Buccaneers 7-round mock draft? Feel free to let us know on Twitter at @PFN365!

Ian Cummings is a Draft Analyst for Pro Football Network. You can find his writing here and his voice and face on Pro Football Network Daily. Follow him on Twitter @ian_cummings_9.

Podcast: More than Football with Trey Wingo To subscribe to More than Football with Trey Wingo and Brett Yarris, find us on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or your favorite podcast player.

RELATED ARTICLES
FEATURED